Chris P. Jewell

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The science of networks has revolutionised research into the dynamics of interacting elements. It could be argued that epidemiology in particular has embraced the potential of network theory more than any other discipline. Here we review the growing body of research concerning the spread of infectious diseases on networks, focusing on the interplay between(More)
Infectious diseases both within human and animal populations often pose serious health and socioeconomic risks. From a statistical perspective, their prediction is complicated by the fact that no two epidemics are identical due to changing contact habits, mutations of infectious agents, and changing human and animal behaviour in response to the presence of(More)
Contact-tracing data (CTD) collected from disease outbreaks has received relatively little attention in the epidemic modeling literature because it is thought to be unreliable: infection sources might be wrongly attributed, or data might be missing due to resource constraints in the questionnaire exercise. Nevertheless, these data might provide a rich(More)
Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a zoonotic and vector-borne disease, mainly present in Africa, which represents a threat to human health, animal health and production. South Africa has experienced three major RVF epidemics (1950-51, 1973-75 and 2008-11). Due to data scarcity, no previous study has quantified risk factors associated with RVF epidemics in animals(More)
Predicting the spread of vector-borne diseases in response to incursions requires knowledge of both host and vector demographics in advance of an outbreak. Although host population data are typically available, for novel disease introductions there is a high chance of the pathogen using a vector for which data are unavailable. This presents a barrier to(More)
The science of networks has revolutionised research into the dynamics of interacting elements. It could be argued that epidemiology in particular has embraced the potential of network theory more than any other discipline. Here we review the growing body of research concerning the spread of infectious diseases on networks, focusing on the interplay between(More)
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Many people have contributed their information, ideas, and time to the Cal-Learn Demonstration Project. We would like to take this opportunity to thank them for their generous help and support. This project would not have been possible without the cooperation of the young parents in the survey sample, who confided numerous details about(More)
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