Learn More
  • Neil Rickman, Robert Witt, Graham Bird, Ian Crawford, Stephen Drinkwater, Nick Emler +5 others
  • 2006
Principals who exercise favouritism towards certain agents may harm those who are not so favoured. Other papers have produced evidence consistent with the presence of such favouritism but have been unable to consider methods for controlling it. We address this issue in the context of a natural experiment from English soccer, where one particular league(More)
RATIONALE Recent research has shown that 10 min of moderate intensity exercise reduce smoking withdrawal symptoms and desire to smoke in acutely abstinent smokers. The aim of the current study was to determine whether the reductions are related to participant expectation of these effects. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty-five sedentary participants who had(More)
Aims and design Moderate intensity exercise has been shown to reduce common smoking withdrawal symptoms and desire to smoke in acutely abstinent smokers. The aim of the present study was to determine if this was caused by distraction. A secondary aim was to determine whether exercise-related changes in affect were related to reduction in symptoms. Methods(More)
This study compared 3 models of association between personality, personal model beliefs, and self-care in a cross-sectional design. These models were as follows: (a) Emotional stability determines self-care indirectly through personal model beliefs, and conscientiousness is a direct predictor of self-care; (b) emotional stability determines self-care(More)
Public familiarity with basic scientific concepts and principles has been proposed as essential for effective democratic decision-making (Miller, 1998). Empirical research, however, finds that public 'scientific literacy' is generally low, falling well short of what normative criteria would consider 'acceptable.' This has prompted calls to better engage,(More)
OBJECTIVES The self-regulatory model proposes that an individual's cognitive representations of illness threat (illness representations) influence the selection and performance of strategies to cope with that illness (Leventhal, Meyer, & Nerenz, 1980). Also implicit in the model is the proposal that such coping strategies influence illness outcomes. These(More)
We use an experimental panel study design to investigate the effect of providing "value-neutral" information about genomic science in the form of a short film to a random sample of the British public. We find little evidence of attitude change as a function of information provision. However, our results show that information provision significantly(More)
Hélène Joffe's (1996) article provides us with a well-presented argument detailing the failings of Knowledge, Attitude, Belief and Practice (KABP) approaches in the domain of AIDS/HIV prevention behaviours and argues that the Theory of Social Representations (Moscovici, 1984) offers a useful alternative perspective. In this commentary I would like to expand(More)