Chester Grosch

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This paper discusses strategies for effectively portraying 3D flow using volume line integral convolution. Issues include defining an appropriate input texture, clarifying the distinct identities and relative depths of the advected texture elements, and selectively highlighting regions of interest in both the input and output volumes. Apart from offering(More)
This paper discusses strategies for effectively portraying 3D flow using volume line integral convolution. Issues include defining an appropriate input texture, clarifying the distinct identities and relative depths of the advected texture elements, and selectively highlighting regions of interest in both the input and output volumes. Apart from offering(More)
1987 Acknowledgments The significant contributioris of many individuals and organizations made this report possible. In particular-The MPP Working Group members and their technical staffs, who committed their own valuable time during the past two years to explore the potential of the MPP in unique areas of research. who integrated the reports from the four(More)
Introduction Line integral convolution (LIC) is a flow-driven texture generation method that has become one of the best-known and most commonly used techniques in computer graphics for visualizing 2D flow, or flow over a surface in 3D. The popularity of LIC as a tool for 3D flow visualization, or the depiction of flow through a volume, has been relatively(More)
49 A n elegant and versatile technique, line integral convolution (LIC) 1,2 represents directional information via patterns of correlation in a texture. Although most commonly used to depict 2D flow, or flow over a surface in 3D, LIC methods can also portray 3D flow through a volume. 1,3 However, the popularity of LIC as a device for illustrating 3D flow(More)
Line Integral Convolution (LIC), introduced by Cabral and Leedom in 1993, is an elegant and versatile technique for representing directional information via patterns of correlation in a texture. Although most commonly used to depict 2D flow, or flow over a surface in 3D, LIC methods can equivalently bc used to portray 3D flow through a volume. However, the(More)
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