Cherie L. Ramirez

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Engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) are promising tools for genome manipulation, and determining off-target cleavage sites of these enzymes is of great interest. We developed an in vitro selection method that interrogates 10(11) DNA sequences for cleavage by active, dimeric ZFNs. The method revealed hundreds of thousands of DNA sequences, some present(More)
Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) made by Context-Dependent Assembly (CoDA) and Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) provide robust and user-friendly technologies for efficiently inactivating genes in zebrafish. These designer nucleases bind to and cleave DNA at particular target sites, inducing error-prone repair that can result in insertion(More)
Engineered zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) induce DNA double-strand breaks at specific recognition sequences and can promote efficient introduction of desired insertions, deletions or substitutions at or near the cut site via homology-directed repair (HDR) with a double- and/or single-stranded donor DNA template. However, mutagenic events caused by error-prone(More)
Gene-editing nucleases enable targeted modification of DNA sequences in living cells, thereby facilitating efficient knockout and precise editing of endogenous loci. Engineered nucleases also have the potential to introduce mutations at off-target sites of action. Such unintended alterations can confound interpretation of experiments and can have(More)
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