Learn More
Two major arms of the inflammatory response are the NF-κB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathways. Here, we show that enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) employs the type III secretion system to target these two signalling arms by injecting host cells with two effector proteins, NleC and NleD. We provide evidence that NleC and NleD are Zn-dependent(More)
The complex host-pathogen interplay involves the recognition of the pathogen by the host's innate immune system and countermeasures taken by the pathogen. Detection of invading bacteria by the host leads to rapid activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB, followed by inflammation and eradication of the intruders. In response, some pathogens,(More)
The locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) pathogenicity island of enterohemorrhagic and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EHEC and EPEC, respectively) comprises a cluster of operons encoding a type III secretion system and related proteins, all of which are essential for bacterial colonization of the host intestines. The LEE1 operon encodes Ler, which(More)
Enterohemorrhagic and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EHEC and EPEC, respectively) strains represent a major global health problem. Their virulence is mediated by the concerted activity of an array of virulence factors including toxins, a type III protein secretion system (TTSS), pili, and others. We previously showed that EPEC O127 forms a group 4(More)
Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) causes severe diarrhea in young children. Essential for colonization of the host intestine is the LEE pathogenicity island, which comprises a cluster of operons encoding a type III secretion system and related proteins. The LEE1 operon encodes Ler, which positively regulates many EPEC virulence genes in the LEE(More)
The complex host-pathogen interplay involves the recognition of the pathogen by the host's innate immune system and countermeasures taken by the pathogen. Detection of invading bacteria by the host leads to rapid activation of the transcription factor NF-kB, followed by inflammation and eradication of the intruders. In response, some pathogens, including(More)
The complex host-pathogen interplay involves the recognition of the pathogen by the host's innate immune system and countermeasures taken by the pathogen. Detection of invading bacteria by the host leads to rapid activation of the transcription factor NF-kB, followed by inflammation and eradication of the intruders. In response, some pathogens, including(More)
Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), a major gastrointestinal pathogen, causes infantile diarrhea in many developing countries. EPEC is an attaching and effacing (A/E) pathogen that utilizes a LEE-encoded type III secretion system (TTSS) to deliver effector proteins into host cells. These effectors have been identified as potential virulence factors in(More)
Capsules frequently play a key role in bacterial interactions with their environment. Escherichia coli capsules were categorized as groups 1 through 4, each produced by a distinct mechanism. Etk and Etp are members of protein families required for the production of group 1 and group 4 capsules. These members function as a protein tyrosine kinase and protein(More)
Upon infection of host cells, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) delivers a set of effector proteins into the host cell cytoplasm via the type III secretion system (TTSS). The effectors subvert various host cell functions. We found that EPEC interferes with the spreading and ultimately with the attachment of suspended fibroblasts or epithelial cells,(More)