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Olfactory ensheathing cells transplanted into the injured spinal cord in animals promote regeneration and remyelination of descending motor pathways through the site of injury and the return of motor functions. In a single-blind, Phase I clinical trial, we aimed to test the feasibility and safety of transplantation of autologous olfactory ensheathing cells(More)
Olfactory ensheathing cells show promise in preclinical animal models as a cell transplantation therapy for repair of the injured spinal cord. This is a report of a clinical trial of autologous transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells into the spinal cord in six patients with complete, thoracic paraplegia. We previously reported on the methods of(More)
The causes of schizophrenia are unknown, but there is evidence linking subtle deviations in neural development with schizophrenia. Embryonic brain development cannot be studied in an adult with schizophrenia, but neurogenesis and early events in neuronal differentiation can be investigated throughout adult life in the human olfactory epithelium. Our past(More)
A number of compounds aimed at improving cognition in schizophrenia have failed to demonstrate efficacy in Phase 2 clinical trials. Translational studies using biomarkers in surrogate populations, such as schizotypy, could be used to assess the efficacy of novel compounds. In this study, we aimed to validate the sensitivity and inter-site reliability of(More)
The increasing demand to develop more efficient compounds to treat cognitive impairments in schizophrenia has led to the development of experimental model systems. One such model system combines the study of surrogate populations expressing high levels of schizotypy with oculomotor biomarkers. We aimed (1) to replicate oculomotor deficits in a psychometric(More)
In this paper the response of cerebral phosphate metabolism to mild hypoxia in young, medium and old rats has been studied via in-vivo [31P]nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). It was found that the young adults (5-6 months) were more sensitive to this mild stress than either the mature adult (11-12 months) or senescent (23-24 months) rats even though the(More)
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