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We sought to describe cerebrovascular responses to incremental exercise and test the hypothesis that changes in cerebral oxygenation influence maximal performance. Eleven men cycled in three conditions: 1) sea level (SL); 2) acute hypoxia [AH; hypobaric chamber, inspired Po(2) (Pi(O(2))) 86 Torr]; and 3) chronic hypoxia [CH; 4,300 m, Pi(O(2)) 86 Torr]. At(More)
The purpose of this study was to determine whether cycling time trial (TT) performance differs between hypobaric hypoxia (HH) and normobaric hypoxia (NH) at the same ambient PO2 (93 mmHg, 4,300-m altitude equivalent). Two groups of healthy fit men were matched on physical performance and demographic characteristics and completed a 720-kJ time trial on a(More)
There is an expectation that repeated daily exposures to normobaric hypoxia (NH) will induce ventilatory acclimatization and lessen acute mountain sickness (AMS) and the exercise performance decrement during subsequent hypobaric hypoxia (HH) exposure. However, this notion has not been tested objectively. Healthy, unacclimatized sea-level (SL) residents(More)
PURPOSE To investigate the effects of prolonged hypoxia and antioxidant supplementation on ventilatory threshold (VT) during high-altitude (HA) exposure (4300 m). METHODS Sixteen physically fit males (25 +/- 5 yr; 77.8 +/- 8.5 kg) performed an incremental test to maximal exertion on a cycle ergometer at sea level (SL). Subjects were then matched on(More)
PURPOSE This study tested the hypothesis that antioxidant supplementation would attenuate plasma cytokine (IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha), and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations at rest and in response to exercise at 4300-m elevation. METHODS A total of 17 recreationally trained men were matched and assigned to an antioxidant (N = 9) or(More)
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