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Recent studies have shown that when phonating subjects hear their voice pitch feedback shift upward or downward, they respond with a change in voice fundamental frequency (F0) output. Three experiments were performed to improve our understanding of this response and to explore the effects of different stimulus variables on voice F0 responses to pitch-shift(More)
This study examined tongue function and its relation to swallowing in 13 subjects with oral or oropharyngeal cancer treated with primary radiotherapy +/- chemotherapy and 13 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Measures of swallowing and tongue function were obtained using videofluoroscopy, pretreatment and 2 months posttreatment. Maximum isometric(More)
Recent studies done on healthy older individuals have demonstrated elevated taste thresholds for sweet, sour, and salty taste. At suprathreshold levels, such individuals have also shown less ability to discriminate between different intensities of the same tastant. This study was designed to provide information on swallow timing and muscle contraction(More)
Auditory feedback has been suggested to be important for voice fundamental frequency (F0) control. The present study featured a new technique for testing this hypothesis by which the pitch of a subject's voice was modulated, fed back over earphones, and the resultant change in the emitted voice F0 was measured. The responses of 67 normal, healthy young(More)
When air conducted auditory feedback pitch is experimentally shifted upward or downward during steady phonation, voice pitch changes in response. The first pitch change is an automatic deflection opposite in direction to the feedback shift. It appears to help stabilize voice pitch by counteracting unintended changes. But what happens during an intended(More)
Recent research has found that while speaking, subjects react to perturbations in pitch of voice auditory feedback by changing their voice fundamental frequency (F0) to compensate for the perceived pitch-shift. The long response latencies (150-200 ms) suggest they may be too slow to assist in on-line control of the local pitch contour patterns associated(More)
1. Small 'step' or sinusoidal displacements were imposed on the mandible while human subjects maintained an average biting force of 10 N. Phase-related changes in the force resisting sinusoidal displacement were used to determine the mechanical stiffness of the human mandibular system as a function of the frequency of stretching. 2. Jaw-muscle(More)
The purpose of the present study was to investigate the responsiveness of the pitch-shift reflex to small magnitude stimuli and voice fundamental frequency (F(0)) level. English speakers received pitch-shifted voice feedback (+/-10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 cents, 200 ms duration) during vowel phonations at a high and a low F(0) level. Mean pitch-shift response(More)
The motor-driven predictions about expected sensory feedback (efference copies) have been proposed to play an important role in recognition of sensory consequences of self-produced motor actions. In the auditory system, this effect was suggested to result in suppression of sensory neural responses to self-produced voices that are predicted by the efference(More)
Extracellular recordings were made from 73 periaqueductal gray (PAG) neurons in an awake, vocalizing monkey (Macaca fascicularis). About 50% of the neurons were inactive and only began discharging prior to laryngeal EMG activity and vocalization; they reached their peak firing rate near the onset of vocalization and then became inactive again.(More)