Charles R. Larson

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Recent studies have shown that when phonating subjects hear their voice pitch feedback shift upward or downward, they respond with a change in voice fundamental frequency (F0) output. Three experiments were performed to improve our understanding of this response and to explore the effects of different stimulus variables on voice F0 responses to pitch-shift(More)
This study examined tongue function and its relation to swallowing in 13 subjects with oral or oropharyngeal cancer treated with primary radiotherapy +/- chemotherapy and 13 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Measures of swallowing and tongue function were obtained using videofluoroscopy, pretreatment and 2 months posttreatment. Maximum isometric(More)
Recent studies done on healthy older individuals have demonstrated elevated taste thresholds for sweet, sour, and salty taste. At suprathreshold levels, such individuals have also shown less ability to discriminate between different intensities of the same tastant. This study was designed to provide information on swallow timing and muscle contraction(More)
Recent research has found that while speaking, subjects react to perturbations in pitch of voice auditory feedback by changing their voice fundamental frequency (F0) to compensate for the perceived pitch-shift. The long response latencies (150-200 ms) suggest they may be too slow to assist in on-line control of the local pitch contour patterns associated(More)
The motor-driven predictions about expected sensory feedback (efference copies) have been proposed to play an important role in recognition of sensory consequences of self-produced motor actions. In the auditory system, this effect was suggested to result in suppression of sensory neural responses to self-produced voices that are predicted by the efference(More)
When air conducted auditory feedback pitch is experimentally shifted upward or downward during steady phonation, voice pitch changes in response. The first pitch change is an automatic deflection opposite in direction to the feedback shift. It appears to help stabilize voice pitch by counteracting unintended changes. But what happens during an intended(More)
Previous findings have shown that subjects respond to an alteration, or shift, of auditory feedback pitch with a change in voice fundamental frequency (F0). When pitch shifts exceeding 500 ms in duration were presented, subjects' averaged responses appeared to consist of both an early and a late component. The latency of the second response was long enough(More)
Auditory feedback has been suggested to be important for voice fundamental frequency (F0) control. The present study featured a new technique for testing this hypothesis by which the pitch of a subject's voice was modulated, fed back over earphones, and the resultant change in the emitted voice F0 was measured. The responses of 67 normal, healthy young(More)
The present study tested whether subjects respond to unanticipated short perturbations in voice loudness feedback with compensatory responses in voice amplitude. The role of stimulus magnitude (+/- 1,3 vs 6 dB SPL), stimulus direction (up vs down), and the ongoing voice amplitude level (normal vs soft) were compared across compensations. Subjects responded(More)