Charles N R Henderson

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BACKGROUND Despite dramatic declines in children's blood lead concentrations and a lowering of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's level of concern to 10 microg per deciliter (0.483 micromol per liter), little is known about children's neurobehavioral functioning at lead concentrations below this level. METHODS We measured blood lead(More)
CONTEXT Home-visitation services have been promoted as a means of improving maternal and child health and functioning. However, long-term effects have not been examined. OBJECTIVE To examine the long-term effects of a program of prenatal and early childhood home visitation by nurses on women's life course and child abuse and neglect. DESIGN Randomized(More)
From the Division of Nutritional Sciences (R.L.C.) and the Department of Human Development (C.R.H.), College of Human Ecology, Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y.; the Departments of Environmental Medicine (D.A.C.-S.) and Biostatistics and Computational Biology (C.C.), University of Rochester School of Medicine, Rochester, N.Y.; the Division of Epidemiology,(More)
CONTEXT Interest in home-visitation services as a way of improving maternal and child outcomes has grown out of the favorable results of a trial in semirural New York. The findings have not been replicated in other populations. OBJECTIVE To test the effect of prenatal and infancy home visits by nurses on pregnancy-induced hypertension, preterm delivery,(More)
OBJECTIVE To examine the effectiveness of home visiting by paraprofessionals and by nurses as separate means of improving maternal and child health when both types of visitors are trained in a program model that has demonstrated effectiveness when delivered by nurses. METHODS A randomized, controlled trial was conducted in public- and private-care(More)
We evaluated a comprehensive program of prenatal and postpartum nurse home visitation. The program was designed to prevent a wide range of health and developmental problems in children born to primiparous women who were either teenagers, unmarried, or of low socioeconomic status. During pregnancy, women who were visited by nurses, compared with women(More)
OBJECTIVE To examine the effects of prenatal and infancy home visiting by paraprofessionals and by nurses from child age 2 through age 4 years. METHODS We conducted, in public and private care settings in Denver, Colorado, a randomized, controlled trial with 3 arms, ie, control, paraprofessional visits, and nurse visits. Home visits were provided from(More)
A program of prenatal and infancy home visitation by nurses was tested as a method of preventing a wide range of health and developmental problems in children born to primiparas who were either teenagers, unmarried, or of low socioeconomic status. Among the women at highest risk for care-giving dysfunction, those who were visited by a nurse had fewer(More)
CONTEXT Home visitation to families with young children has been promoted as an effective way to prevent child maltreatment, but few studies have examined the conditions under which such programs meet this goal. OBJECTIVE To investigate whether the presence of domestic violence limits the effects of nurse home visitation interventions in reducing(More)
Blood Lead Concentrations < 10 μg/dL and Child Intelligence at 6 Years of Age Todd A. Jusko,1 Charles R. Henderson Jr.,2 Bruce P. Lanphear,3 Deborah A. Cory-Slechta,4 Patrick J. Parsons,5,6 and Richard L. Canfield7 1Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA; 2Department of(More)