Charles Laywine

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A Latin square of order n is an n x n array of cells, such that each row and column contains a permutation of the first n integers. We will use Burnside’s lemma [2, Theorem 5-21 to count the number of equivalence classes under row and column permutations. If G is the group that permutes Latin squares of order n by all possible interchanges of rows and(More)
In [3]s the first author obtained an expression for the number of equivalence classes induced on the set of ft x ft Latin squares under row and column permutations. The first purpose of this paper is to point out that the results of [3] do not hold for all n, but rather that they hold only if n is a prime.* The second purpose of this paper is, in the case(More)
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