Charles A. Williams

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To understand the genetic heterogeneity underlying developmental delay, we compared copy number variants (CNVs) in 15,767 children with intellectual disability and various congenital defects (cases) to CNVs in 8,329 unaffected adult controls. We estimate that ∼14.2% of disease in these children is caused by CNVs >400 kb. We observed a greater enrichment of(More)
OBJECTIVES Deletion 1p36 syndrome is a recently delineated disorder, considered to be the most common subtelomeric microdeletion syndrome (1 in 5000 newborns). 1p36.3 deletions account for 0.5% to 1.2% of idiopathic mental retardation; thus, knowledge about the condition is important for pediatricians caring for such patients. Despite 100 reported cases,(More)
In 1995, a consensus statement was published for the purpose of summarizing the salient clinical features of Angelman syndrome (AS) to assist the clinician in making a timely and accurate diagnosis. Considering the scientific advances made in the last 10 years, it is necessary now to review the validity of the original consensus criteria. As in the original(More)
BACKGROUND Angelman syndrome (AS) is a severe neurobehavioural disorder caused by defects in the maternally derived imprinted domain located on 15q11-q13. Most patients acquire AS by one of five mechanisms: (1) a large interstitial deletion of 15q11-q13; (2) paternal uniparental disomy (UPD) of chromosome 15; (3) an imprinting defect (ID); (4) a mutation in(More)
Familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (IBGC) or Fahr's disease is a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized by calcium deposits in the basal ganglia and other brain regions, which is associated with neuropsychiatric and motor symptoms. Familial IBGC is genetically heterogeneous and typically transmitted in an autosomal dominant fashion. We(More)
Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are clinically distinct complex disorders mapped to chromosome 15q11-q13. They both have characteristic neurologic, developmental, and behavioral phenotypes plus other structural and functional abnormalities. However, the cognitive and neurologic impairment is more severe in AS, including seizures and(More)
PURPOSE The primary goal of this case study was to describe the speech, prosody, and voice characteristics of a mother and daughter with a breakpoint in a balanced 7;13 chromosomal translocation that disrupted the transcription gene, FOXP2 (cf. J. B. Tomblin et al., 2005). As with affected members of the widely cited KE family, whose communicative disorders(More)
The Angelman (AS) and Prader-Willi (PWS) syndromes are two clinically distinct disorders that are caused by a differential parental origin of chromosome 15q11-q13 deletions. Both also can result from uniparental disomy (the inheritance of both copies of chromosome 15 from only one parent). Loss of the paternal copy of 15q11-q13, whether by deletion or(More)
Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most common human autosomal dominant diseases. NF1 is characterized by café-au-lait spots (CLS), axillary freckles and Lisch nodules of the iris. Another hallmark of NF1 is the development of neurofibromas, benign tumours that arise from peripheral nerve sheaths. NF1 patients also have an increased incidence of(More)