Cecilio Paniagua

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  • C Paniagua
  • Journal of the American Psychoanalytic…
  • 1991
Surface is a term often used in clinical theory, which seems to have eluded a reliable definition. Freud used the term mostly to denote the analysand's consciousness. This patient's surface does not always coincide with the data the analyst can observe, i.e., the clinical surface. It is proposed that clinical surface be understood, in contrast to other(More)
  • C Paniagua
  • The International journal of psycho-analysis
  • 2001
The author argues that although the topographical model is useful for understanding certain psychological phenomena, its technical applications pose certain problems. The model's inherent tendency to bypass the analysand's ego capacities and mix his or her associations with the analyst's own make it less than adequate. There has never been a rapid evolution(More)
  • C Paniagua
  • Journal of the American Psychoanalytic…
  • 1997
Little has been written on the analysand's failure to act in the session when some form of motoric reaction or behavior seems appropriate and expectable. This phenomenon is conceptualized as negative acting in. Several clinical vignettes are provided. The importance of analytic interventions at these moments of behavioral omission, the possible(More)
The author argues that the technical advances stemming from Freud's (1923) introduction of the structural theory permit a more naturalistic and specific approach to analyzing unconscious conflict, thus facilitating id analysis. The earlier topographical technique underestimated the role of suggestion; often, it entailed interference with patients' capacity(More)
This paper deals with what seems an insufficiently explored aspect of psychoanalytic practice: the ripple effect of a patient's evolution on the present and future of his or her significant others. Clinical vignettes are provided to illustrate patients' influence on relatives; patients acting as therapists; psychoanalysis by proxy; the ripple effect in(More)
  • C Paniagua
  • Journal of the American Psychoanalytic…
  • 1982
The mind uses analogies in order to understand the unknown. The utilization of these is explored in Freud's writings and in science in general. Analogies can be metaphorical (figurative) or isomorphic (literal); the latter are used in the induction of scientific hypotheses. The distinction between these two forms of comparing can be ambiguous. The(More)
  • C Paniagua
  • The International journal of psycho-analysis
  • 1998
Acting in' is a term that has not met with much success in the psychoanalytic literature. The literature has focused mainly on quite dramatic forms of acting during sessions rather than on subtler and more common forms of intraclinical acting. Zeligs (1957) gave the term 'acting in' a surprisingly restrictive denotation. A redefinition is suggested,(More)