Catriona Havard

Learn More
Research on sex differences in face recognition has reported mixed results, on balance suggesting an advantage for female observers. However, it is not clear whether this advantage is specific to face processing or reflects a more general superiority effect in episodic memory. The current study therefore examined sex differences with a face-matching task(More)
A large body of work report a leftward bias in face processing. However, it is not clear whether this leftward bias purely reflects the dominance of the right hemisphere or is influenced by scanning habits developed by reading directions. Here, we report two experiments examining how well native readers of right to left Arabic scripts (Egyptians) could(More)
A group of young-adult (aged 18-35 years) and older-adult witnesses (aged 61-83 years) viewed films of two similar staged thefts, one that depicted a young culprit and the other an older culprit. After a short delay of 40-60 minutes participants were presented with two separate video line-ups, one for each target. In one line-up the target was present (TP)(More)
Because swallowing disorders are frequent in the elderly, we assessed the relationship between age and mylohyoideus muscle contraction, which is an important component of the initial step in swallowing. In a prospective study, 120 subjects without any personal history of diseases associated with swallowing disorders underwent electromyographic recording(More)
The Open University's repository of research publications and other research outputs The Mystery Man can help reduce false identifications for child witnesses:evidence from video lineups Journal Article How to cite: Havard, Catriona and Memon, Amina (2013). The Mystery Man can help reduce false identifications for child witnesses:evidence from video(More)
(2015). Selfish learning: The impact of self-referential encoding on children's literacy attainment. Learning and instruction, 40 pp. 54–60. For guidance on citations see FAQs. Copyright and Moral Rights for the articles on this site are retained by the individual authors and/or other copyright owners. For more information on Open Research Online's data(More)
Previous research on disfluency types has focused on their distinct cognitive causes, prosodic patterns, or effects on the listener [9, 12, 17, 21]. This paper seeks to add to this taxonomy by providing a psycholinguistic account of the dialogue and gaze behaviour speakers engage in when they make certain types of disfluency. Dialogues came from a version(More)
  • 1