Cathy A. Pelletier

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The ability of sour and sweet–sour mixtures to improve swallowing in 11 nursing home residents with neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia was investigated using fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing. Citric acid (2.7%) significantly reduced aspiration and penetration compared with water. Teaspoon delivery of liquids significantly reduced aspiration(More)
This study presents the results of a blinded test of the performance of five commercial thickeners. Experimental variables considered are brand of commercial thickener, type of liquid, desired thickness, and thickening time. Success of outcome is defined by a numerical rating scale comparing the consistency and taste to actual liquid samples. The findings(More)
OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS This study tested the hypotheses that swallowing apnea duration (SAD) will increase given barium versus water, chemesthetic stimuli (i.e., water < ethanol, acid, and carbonation) mixed with barium, age (older > younger), and genetic taste differences (supertasters > nontasters). STUDY DESIGN Prospective group design. SETTING(More)
OBJECTIVE This study tested the hypotheses that swallowing apnea duration (SAD) will increase given chemesthetic stimuli (ie, water < ethanol, acid, and carbonation), age (older > young), and genetic taste differences (supertasters > nontasters). STUDY DESIGN Prospective group design. SETTING University medical center. SUBJECTS AND METHODS Eighty(More)
OBJECTIVE This study examined swallowing apnea duration (SAD) and respiratory phase patterns as a function of taste, tastes combined with barium, age, and genetic taste group. STUDY DESIGN Prospective group design. SETTING University medical center. SUBJECTS AND METHODS Eighty healthy adult women were identified as nontasters and supertasters and(More)
PURPOSE The effortful swallow, a compensatory technique frequently employed by speech-language pathologists for their patients with dysphagia, is still not fully understood in terms of how it modifies the swallow. In particular, although age-related changes are known to reduce maximum isometric tongue pressure, it is not known whether age affects people's(More)
To understand disordered physiology, it is first necessary to determine what constitutes normal function. Liquid sip size during swallowing in healthy individuals has been investigated with varied results. Bolus size is a variable that is manipulated in both research studies and clinical swallowing assessments, so defining normal sip size has relevance in(More)
The purpose of this study was to examine certified nurse assistants' (CNAs') knowledge of dysphagia and how to feed nursing home residents using nonparticipatory structured feeding observation, critique of staged feeding behaviors on film, and semistructured interview in a triangulation methods design. Content analysis of the data confirmed previous studies(More)
In this study, the author examined the feeding beliefs of 20 certified nurse assistants (CNAs) working in nursing homes using Q methodology and semistructured interviews. Beliefs are defined as a combination of CNA feeding knowledge, experience, and values. Two groups of CNAs with contra belief systems emerged from the analysis. "Social feeders" believe(More)
Taste is a property that is thought to potentially modulate swallowing behavior. Whether such effects depend on taste, intensity remains unclear. This study explored differences in the amplitudes of tongue-palate pressures in swallowing as a function of taste stimulus concentration. Tongue-palate pressures were collected in 80 healthy women, in two age(More)