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The members of the Aquarana (or Rana catesbeiana species group) form a monophyletic group comprising seven species: R. catesbeiana, Rana clamitans, Rana grylio, Rana virgatipes, Rana septentrionalis, Rana heckscheri and Rana okaloosae. Previous work has led to structural characterization of the antimicrobial peptides present in electrically-stimulated skin(More)
The members of the Aquarana (or Rana catesbeiana species group) form a well-supported monophyletic clade but phylogenetic relationships between species within the group are incompletely understood. Peptides that differentially inhibited the growth of bacteria were purified from electrically stimulated skin secretions of the carpenter frog Rana virgatipes.(More)
Skin secretions were obtained from male, female, and juvenile specimens of the mink frog (Rana septentrionalis) by electric stimulation and shown to contain 10 peptides that differentially inhibited the growth of microorganisms. The elution profiles of secretions from the three groups following reverse-phase HPLC were almost identical indicating that there(More)
The tailed frog Ascaphus truei Stejneger, 1899 is the most primitive extant anuran and the sister taxon to the clade of all other living frogs. The species occupies two disjunct ranges in the Northwest region of North America: the Cascade Mountains and coastal area from British Columbia to Northern California, and an inland range in the northern Rocky(More)
Numerous peptides exhibiting antimicrobial properties have been isolated from the skins of many amphibian species. These peptides offer an innate chemical defense system against various microbial agents that exist in the amphibian's environment. Amphibian skin peptides are typically tested for antimicrobial activity against microbial strains that are(More)
Chorusing males of the neotropical treefrog Hyla microcephala call in distinct bouts punctuated by periods of silence, a pattern known as unison bout singing. Schwartz (1991) previously tested and refuted the hypotheses that males periodically stop calling either because of a female preference for males that call cyclically, or because high ambient noise(More)
Calling activity in frogs is energetically demanding to males because they usually perform at or near their physiological capacities. Metabolic fuel for muscle contractions during bouts of aerobic calling activity comes from carbohydrates and lipids that are stored in the trunk muscles. I monitored nightly calling performance in males of seven tropical frog(More)
Recommended Citation Wulff, Charles R., "The impact of tricaine methanesulfonate, 2-phenoxyethanol, and carvone-methyl salicylate on the innate immune response of zebrafish (Danio rerio)" (2011). Honors Theses. Paper 621. The impact of tricaine methanesulfonate, 2-phenoxyethanol, and carvone-methyl salicylate on the innate immune response of zebrafish(More)
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