Catherine N. Correa

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OBJECTIVE This study examined subsite-specific colorectal cancer incidence rates and stage distributions for Asians and Pacific Islanders (API) and compared the API data with data for Whites and African Americans. METHODS Data included 336,798 invasive colorectal cancer incident cases for 1995 to 1999 from 23 population-based central cancer registries,(More)
PURPOSE To examine cancer incidence patterns among adolescents and young adults in the United States. METHODS Cancer incidence data from 26 population-based central cancer registries for 1992-1997 were used. Individual cancers were grouped into specific diagnostic groups and subgroups using an integrated classification scheme. The integrated scheme was(More)
BACKGROUND Studies of persons with colorectal cancer have reported increased risk of subsequent primary cancers. Results have not been consistent, however, and there is little information about such risk in specific races and ethnic populations. METHODS Using 1975-2001 data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program, we assembled(More)
Because of the high density of industries along the Lower Mississippi River, there is a concern about adverse impact on health, including cancer, among residents in these parishes. This study provides an update of cancer incidence in the Industrial Corridor for the period 1989-93. Age-adjusted cancer incidence rates were calculated for the seven-parish(More)
Objective: This study examined subsite-specific colorectal cancer incidence rates and stage distributions for Asians and Pacific Islanders (API) and compared the API data with data for Whites and African Americans. Methods: Data included 336,798 invasive colorectal cancer incident cases for 1995 to 1999 from 23 population-based central cancer registries,(More)
Data from numerous studies show that lumpectomy (breast-conserving therapy) plus radiation therapy provides survival equivalent to that following mastectomy (either modified radical or radical mastectomy) for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). According to the data from the National Cancer Data Base and the Surveillance Epidemiology End Results(More)
A comprehensive framework for cancer surveillance should span the entire lifespan and be capable of providing information on risk, burden, disparity, cost, cancer care, survival, and death. Cancer incidence, the point in the continuum when an individual is diagnosed with cancer, has a strong, well-developed system to produce information about newly(More)