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BACKGROUND Despite a consensus that the use of health information technology should lead to more efficient, safer, and higher-quality care, there are no reliable estimates of the prevalence of adoption of electronic health records in U.S. hospitals. METHODS We surveyed all acute care hospitals that are members of the American Hospital Association for the(More)
BACKGROUND Electronic health records have the potential to improve the delivery of health care services. However, in the United States, physicians have been slow to adopt such systems. This study assessed physicians' adoption of outpatient electronic health records, their satisfaction with such systems, the perceived effect of the systems on the quality of(More)
Electronic health records (EHRs) are promising tools to improve quality and efficiency in health care, but data on their adoption rate are limited. We identified surveys on EHR adoption and assessed their quality. Although surveys returned widely different estimates of EHR use, when available information is limited to studies of high or medium quality,(More)
CONTEXT How often physicians alter their clinical behavior because of the threat of malpractice liability, termed defensive medicine, and the consequences of those changes, are central questions in the ongoing medical malpractice reform debate. OBJECTIVE To study the prevalence and characteristics of defensive medicine among physicians practicing in(More)
As the United States expends extraordinary efforts towards the digitization of its healthcare system, and as policy makers across the globe look to information technology as a means of making healthcare systems safer, more affordable, and more accessible, a rare and remarkable opportunity has emerged for the information systems research community to(More)
Understanding whether electronic health records, as currently adopted, improve quality and efficiency has important implications for how best to employ the estimated $20 billion in health information technology incentives authorized by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. We examined electronic health record adoption in U.S. hospitals and the(More)
OBJECTIVE To examine the importance of continuous health insurance for access to care by comparing the access and cost experiences of insured adults with a recent time uninsured to the experiences of currently uninsured adults and experiences of adults with no time uninsured within a reference time period (continuously insured). DATA SOURCES Adults ages(More)
OBJECTIVE Physician practices may adopt and use electronic prescribing (eRx) in response to mandates, incentives, and perceived value of the technology. Yet, for the most part, diffusion has been limited and geographically confined, and even when adopted, use of eRx in many practices has been low. One explanation for this phenomenon is that decision-makers(More)
This article reports on a comparative survey of sicker adults in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The study finds that despite differences among the health care systems, large proportions of citizens across the five countries report dissatisfaction with their health care system and serious problems including medical(More)
OBJECTIVES To determine the proportion of US hospitals engaged in health information exchange (HIE) with unaffiliated providers and to identify key hospital-level and market-level factors associated with participating in exchange. STUDY DESIGN Using the 2009 American Hospital Association Information Technology survey, supplemented by Dartmouth Atlas, Area(More)