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Memory Awareness for Faces in Individuals with Autism
Little is known regarding metacognition in individuals with autism. Specifically, it is unclear how individuals with autism think about their own mental states. The current study assessed memoryExpand
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Prototype formation in autism: Can individuals with autism abstract facial prototypes?
Prototype formation is a critical skill for category learning. Research suggests that individuals with autism may have a deficit in prototype formation of some objects; however, results are mixed.Expand
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The cost of selective attention in category learning: developmental differences between adults and infants.
Selective attention plays an important role in category learning. However, immaturities of top-down attentional control during infancy coupled with successful category learning suggest that earlyExpand
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Gender discrimination of eyes and mouths by individuals with autism
Evidence remains mixed about whether individuals with autism look less to eyes and whether they look more at mouths. Few studies have examined how spontaneous attention to facial features relates toExpand
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The Development of Facial Gender Categorization in Individuals with and without Autism: The Impact of Typicality
While much research has examined the development of facial recognition abilities, less is known about the ability of individuals with and without autism to categorize facial gender. The current studyExpand
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The Effect of Labels on Visual Attention: An Eye Tracking Study
The Effect of Labels on Visual Attention: An Eye Tracking Study Catherine A. Best (best.140@osu.edu) Center for Cognitive Science, The Ohio State University 208G Ohio Stadium East, 1961 Tuttle ParkExpand
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Automatic selection of eye tracking variables in visual categorization for adults and infants
TLDR
We propose an automated method for selecting eye tracking variables based on their usefulness to discriminate learners from non-learners of visual categories. Expand
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A Lack of Left Visual Field Bias When Individuals with Autism Process Faces
It has been established that typically developing individuals have a bias to attend to facial information in the left visual field (LVF) more than in the right visual field. This bias is thought toExpand
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The Role of Words in Cognitive Tasks: What, When, and How?
The current review focuses on how exposure to linguistic input, and count nouns in particular, affect performance on various cognitive tasks, including individuation, categorization and categoryExpand
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