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The abnormal accumulation of the microtubule-binding protein tau is associated with a number of neurodegenerative conditions, and correlates with cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. The ubiquitin ligase carboxy terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) and the molecular chaperone Hsp90 are implicated in protein triage decisions involving tau, and(More)
Protein phosphatase 2B (calcineurin) activity has been shown to be decreased in Alzheimer's disease and is a possible mechanism(s) for the hyperphosphorylation of tau and subsequent neurofibrillary tangle formation. Recently, mRNA expression of Down's syndrome Critical Region 1 gene, which encodes the protein calcipressin (an endogenous inhibitor of(More)
BACKGROUND Covalent linkage of ubiquitin regulates the function and, ultimately, the degradation of many proteins by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Given its essential role in protein regulation, even slight perturbations in UPS activity can substantially impair cellular function. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS We have generated and characterized(More)
Progranulin (PGRN), a widely secreted growth factor, is involved in multiple biological functions, and mutations located within the PGRN gene (GRN) are a major cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43-positive inclusions (FLTD-TDP). In light of recent reports suggesting PGRN functions as a protective neurotrophic factor and that sortilin(More)
The accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau in neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) is a neuropathological hallmark of tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and chronic traumatic encephalopathy, but effective therapies directly targeting the tau protein are currently lacking. Herein, we describe a novel mechanism in which the acetylation of tau on KXGS(More)
It is well established that the microtubules of the mitotic spindle are organized by a variety of motor proteins, and it appears that the same motors or closely related variants organize microtubules in the postmitotic neuron. Specifically, cytoplasmic dynein and the kinesin-related motor known as CHO1/MKLP1 are used within the mitotic spindle, and recent(More)
Impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) has long been considered an attractive hypothesis to explain the selective dysfunction and death of neurons in polyglutamine disorders such as Huntington's disease (HD). The fact that inclusion bodies in HD mouse models and patient brains are rich in ubiquitin and proteasome components suggests that the(More)
Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) has been subdivided based on the main pathology found in the brains of affected individuals. When the primary pathology is aggregated, hyperphosphorylated tau, the pathological diagnosis is FTLD-tau. When the primary pathology is cytoplasmic and/or nuclear aggregates of phosphorylated TAR-DNA-binding protein(More)
The identification of tau protein as a major constituent of neurofibrillary tangles spurred considerable effort devoted to identifying and validating pathways through which therapeutics may alleviate tau burden in Alzheimer’s disease and related tauopathies, including chronic traumatic encephalopathy associated with sport- and military-related injuries.(More)