Casey N. Cook

Learn More
Inclusions of TAR DNA-binding protein-43 (TDP-43), a nuclear protein that regulates transcription and RNA splicing, are the defining histopathological feature of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions (FTLD-Us) and sporadic and familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In ALS and FTLD-U, aggregated, ubiquitinated,(More)
The abnormal accumulation of the microtubule-binding protein tau is associated with a number of neurodegenerative conditions, and correlates with cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. The ubiquitin ligase carboxy terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) and the molecular chaperone Hsp90 are implicated in protein triage decisions involving tau, and(More)
Dendrites are short stout tapering processes that are rich in ribosomes and Golgi elements, whereas axons are long thin processes of uniform diameter that are deficient in these organelles. It has been hypothesized that the unique morphological and compositional features of axons and dendrites result from their distinct patterns of microtubule polarity(More)
Parkinson's disease (PD), like a number of neurodegenerative diseases associated with aging, is characterized by the abnormal accumulation of protein in a specific subset of neurons. Although researchers have recently elucidated the genetic causes of PD, much remains unknown about what causes increased protein deposition in the disease. Given that increased(More)
Protein phosphatase 2B (calcineurin) activity has been shown to be decreased in Alzheimer's disease and is a possible mechanism(s) for the hyperphosphorylation of tau and subsequent neurofibrillary tangle formation. Recently, mRNA expression of Down's syndrome Critical Region 1 gene, which encodes the protein calcipressin (an endogenous inhibitor of(More)
The evidence for impairment in the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) is mounting and becoming increasingly more convincing. However, it is presently unclear whether UPS dysfunction is a cause or result of PD pathology, a crucial distinction which impedes both the understanding of disease pathogenesis and the development of(More)
Tau protein can transfer between neurons transneuronally and trans-synaptically, which is thought to explain the progressive spread of tauopathy observed in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Here we show that physiological tau released from donor cells can transfer to recipient cells via the medium, suggesting that at least one mechanism by(More)
BACKGROUND It is essential to determine the specificity of AV-1451 PET for tau in brain imaging by using pathological comparisons. We performed autoradiography in autopsy-confirmed Alzheimer disease and other neurodegenerative disorders to evaluate the specificity of AV-1451 binding for tau aggregates. METHODS Tissue samples were selected that had a(More)
The accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau in neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) is a neuropathological hallmark of tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and chronic traumatic encephalopathy, but effective therapies directly targeting the tau protein are currently lacking. Herein, we describe a novel mechanism in which the acetylation of tau on KXGS(More)
Progranulin (PGRN), a widely secreted growth factor, is involved in multiple biological functions, and mutations located within the PGRN gene (GRN) are a major cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43-positive inclusions (FLTD-TDP). In light of recent reports suggesting PGRN functions as a protective neurotrophic factor and that sortilin(More)