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Evidenced-based guidelines for management of infants and children with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) were prepared by an expert panel comprising clinicians and investigators representing community pediatrics, public health, and the pediatric specialties of critical care, emergency medicine, hospital medicine, infectious diseases, pulmonology, and(More)
BACKGROUND Acute otitis media (AOM) occurs as a complication of viral upper respiratory tract infections in young children. AOM and respiratory viruses both display seasonal variation. Our objective was to examine the temporal association between circulating respiratory viruses and the occurrence of pediatric ambulatory care visits for AOM. METHODS This(More)
Evidenced-based guidelines for management of infants and children with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) were prepared by an expert panel comprising clinicians and investigators representing community pediatrics, public health, and the pediatric specialties of critical care, emergency medicine, hospital medicine, infectious diseases, pulmonology, and(More)
The ideal clinical diagnostic system should deliver rapid, sensitive, specific and reproducible results while minimizing the requirements for specialized laboratory facilities and skilled technicians. We describe an integrated diagnostic platform, the "FilmArray", which fully automates the detection and identification of multiple organisms from a single(More)
BACKGROUND Enterovirus (EV) infections commonly cause fever in infants younger than 90 days of age. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has improved our ability to diagnose EV infections. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the utility of blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens for the diagnosis of EV infections by PCR and to describe a large cohort of(More)
OBJECTIVE Enteroviruses are important pathogens in infants, but their true contribution to febrile illness in infants </=90 days old is unknown. The purpose of this study was to use the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for diagnosis of enteroviral (EV) infection in febrile and afebrile infants </=90 days of age to improve the understanding of the(More)
OBJECTIVE The risk of serious bacterial infection (SBI) in febrile infants who are classified as low risk (LR) or high risk (HR) by the Rochester criteria has been established. LR infants average a 1.4% occurrence of SBI, whereas HR infants have an occurrence of 21%. The occurrence of SBI in Rochester LR or HR infants with confirmed viral infections is(More)
Gordonia species are emerging pathogens that are often misidentified as Rhodococcus or Nocardia species but are reliably distinguished by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. We present a case series of 6 episodes of catheter-associated infection caused by Gordonia species in 5 patients seen at a tertiary care pediatric hospital and describe the management(More)
BACKGROUND Intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis against group B Streptococcus (GBS) has reduced the occurrence of serious bacterial infections (SBI) in young infants caused by GBS. Recommendations for initial antibiotic therapy for the febrile infant 1 to 90 days old were developed when infections with GBS were common and antibiotic resistance was rare. (More)
OBJECTIVE Haemophilus influenzae type b causes severe disease in nonimmune infants and young children; other serotypes are uncommon pathogens and thought to have low virulence. Some have hypothesized that with the virtual elimination of H influenzae type b, other serotypes might acquire virulence traits and emerge as important pathogens of children. We(More)