Carol Frieze

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This chapter presents a cultural perspective for thinking about, and acting on, issues concerning gender and computer science and related fi elds. We posit and demonstrate that the notion of a gender divide in how men and women relate to computing, traditionally attributed to gender differences, is largely a result of cultural and environmental conditions.(More)
In this paper we argue that gender difference thinking, with regards to attitudes towards computing, can work against diversity in the field of computing. Indeed, gender difference approaches to the participation of women in computing have not provided adequate explanations for women's declining interest in computer science (CS) and related technical(More)
This paper aims to provide a practical guide for building a student organization and designing activities and events that can encourage and support a community of women in computer science. This guide is based on our experience in building Women@SCS, a community of women in the School of Computer Science (SCS)(2) at Carnegie Mellon University. Rather than(More)
There are some arguments that suggest women need academic handholding, such as a "female friendly" curriculum, in order for them to participate and be successful in computer science and related fields. Then there are other arguments that suggest we need to change the field to suit women or help women adjust to the field. In this paper we present a different(More)
Most studies of gender and computer science have been conducted (out of necessity) in gender-imbalanced environments. The findings often point to significant gender differences, leading the researchers to recommend strategies to meet these differences. One such recommendation is to adopt a female-friendly, contextual approach to curriculum development. 2 In(More)
Most studies of gender and computer science have (of necessity) been conducted in gender imbalanced environments. The findings often point to significant gender differences, leading the researchers to recommend strategies to meet these differences. One such recommendation is to adopt a " contextual approach " to the curriculum In contrast, based on our(More)
Gender difference approaches to the participation of women in computing have not provided adequate explanations for women's declining interest in computer science (CS) and related technical fields. Indeed, the search for gender differences can work against diversity which we define as a cross-gender spectrum of characteristics, interests, abilities,(More)
This paper tells the story of two student initiatives, driven by a desire to diversify the images that surround computing-related disciplines and those who work in them. We believe it may hold some useful pointers for those interested in showing that computer science is so much more than " coding ". It offers easily adaptable models for those interested in(More)