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Genetic Diversity of Invasive Species in the Great Lakes Versus Their Eurasian Source Populations: Insights for Risk Analysis
TLDR
High genetic variability, large numbers of founders, and multiple founding sources likely significantly contribute to the risk of an exotic species introduction's success and persistence. Expand
Genetic variability and phylogeographical patterns of a nonindigenous species invasion: a comparison of exotic vs. native zebra and quagga mussel populations
TLDR
Results showed that exotic populations of zebra and quagga mussels had surprisingly high genetic variability, similar to those in the Eurasian populations, suggesting large numbers of founding individuals and consistent with the hypothesis of multiple colonizations. Expand
Invasion genetics of the Eurasian round goby in North America: tracing sources and spread patterns
TLDR
Substantial genetic variation, multiple founding sources, large number of propagules, and population structure thus likely aided the round goby's ecological success. Expand
PHYLOGEOGRAPHY OF OPHIOBLENNIUS: THE ROLE OF OCEAN CURRENTS AND GEOGRAPHY IN REEF FISH EVOLUTION
TLDR
The Atlantic phylogeny is consistent with Pliocene dispersal from the western to eastern Atlantic, and the depth of these separations (along with prior morphological comparisons) may indicate previously unrecognized species. Expand
Population genetic history of the dreissenid mussel invasions: expansion patterns across North America
TLDR
The results indicate that North American zebra mussels originate from multiple non-native northern European populations, whereas North American quagga mussels trace to native estuaries in the Southern Bug and Dnieper Rivers, and suggest that overland colonization pathways via recreational boats do not necessarily reflect the most proximate connections. Expand
Invasion Genetics of Ponto-Caspian Gobies in the Great Lakes: A ‘Cryptic’ Species, Absence of Founder Effects, and Comparative Risk Analysis
TLDR
Results show that a diverse number of haplotypes characterize round and tubenose goby populations from both North America and Eurasian sites, fitting a risk analysis prediction of high genetic variability in their successful introductions. Expand
Population genetic structure, phylogeography and spawning philopatry in walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) from mitochondrial DNA control region sequences
TLDR
Analysis of spawning populations showed consistency of genotypic frequencies among years and between males and females, supporting philopatry in both sexes, and revealed phylogeographic structure and significant differences among glacial refugia, lakes, basins and some spawning sites. Expand
Escape from the Ponto-Caspian: evolution and biogeography of an endemic goby species flock (Benthophilinae: Gobiidae: Teleostei).
TLDR
Results of all phylogenetic approaches are highly congruent and provide very strong support for recognizing the subfamily Benthophilinae; which encompasses both the "neogobiins" and tadpole gobies, and genetically diverges from other Gobiidae subfamilies-including (non-monophyletic) Gobiinae and Gobinellinae. Expand
Ancient divisions, recent expansions: phylogeography and population genetics of the round goby Apollonia melanostoma
TLDR
This study evaluates the population genetic and biogeographical structure of the round goby across its native and nonindigenous ranges, in light of geological history and its expansion pathways, highlighting how vicariance and anthropogenic disturbances have shaped a rapidly expanding species’ genetic heritage. Expand
Signatures of vicariance, postglacial dispersal and spawning philopatry: population genetics of the walleye Sander vitreus
TLDR
Walleye genetic patterns reflect vicariance among watersheds and glacial refugia, followed by re‐colonization pathways and changing drainage connections that established modern‐day northern populations, whose separations are maintained through spawning site fidelity. Expand
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