Carmen Berasain

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The Wilms' tumor suppressor WT1 is a transcriptional regulator present in the fetal but not in the mature liver. Its expression and functional role in liver diseases remains unexplored. In this study, we analyzed WT1 expression by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and by immunohistochemistry in normal and diseased livers. In addition,(More)
OBJECTIVE To assess the immunomodulatory activity of methylthioadenosine (MTA) in rodent experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and in patients with multiple sclerosis. METHODS We studied the effect of intraperitoneal MTA in the acute and chronic EAE model by quantifying clinical and histological scores and by performing immunohistochemistry(More)
BACKGROUND & AIMS Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. The global HCC BRIDGE study was a multiregional, large-scale, longitudinal cohort study undertaken to improve understanding of real-life management of patients with HCC, from diagnosis to death. METHODS Data were collected retrospectively from(More)
Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most prevalent liver tumor and a deadly disease with limited therapeutic options. Dysregulation of cell signaling pathways is a common denominator in tumorigenesis, including hepatocarcinogenesis. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling system is commonly activated in HCC, and is currently being evaluated(More)
Hepatocarcinogenesis is a complex multistep process in which many different molecular pathways have been implicated. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is refractory to conventional chemotherapeutic agents, and the new targeted therapies are meeting with limited success. Interreceptor crosstalk and the positive feedback between different signaling systems are(More)
BACKGROUND Inflammation and fibrogenesis are directly related to chronic liver disease progression, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development. Currently there are few therapeutic options available to inhibit liver fibrosis. We have evaluated the hepatoprotective and anti-fibrotic potential of orally-administered 5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA) in(More)
Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) liver injury occurs when blood flow is restored after prolonged ischemia. A short interruption of blood flow (ischemic preconditioning [IP]) induces tolerance to subsequent prolonged ischemia through ill-defined mechanisms. Cardiotrophin (CT)-1, a cytokine of the interleukin-6 family, exerts hepatoprotective effects and activates(More)
The liver is a highly differentiated organ with a central role in metabolism, detoxification and systemic homeostasis. To perform its multiple tasks, liver parenchymal cells, the hepatocytes, express a large complement of enabling genes defining their complex phenotype. This phenotype is progressively acquired during fetal development and needs to be(More)
In response to tissue injury the liver mounts a robust protective and regenerative response aimed at the restoration of the lost or damaged parenchyma. Different molecules have been identified to play important roles in the coordination of the reparative process after liver damage. These can be of varied molecular nature, including inflammatory mediators(More)
Objective: To assess the immunomodulatory activity of methylthioadenosine (MTA) in rodent experimental autoimmune en-cephalomyelitis (EAE) and in patients with multiple sclerosis. Methods: We studied the effect of intraperitoneal MTA in the acute and chronic EAE model by quantifying clinical and histological scores and by performing immunohistochemistry(More)
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