Cannas Kwok

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In Australia, women from non-English-speaking backgrounds participate less frequently in breast cancer screening than English-speaking women, and Chinese immigrant women are 50% less likely to participate in breast examinations than Australian-born women. Chinese-born Australians comprise 10% of the overseas-born Australian population, and the immigrant(More)
OBJECTIVE We aim to systematically review studies that identify factors influencing cancer treatment decision-making among indigenous peoples. METHODS Following the outline suggested by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-analysis, a rigorous systematic review and meta-synthesis were conducted of factors that influence cancer(More)
This review aimed to identify the unmet supportive care needs to conduct an integrative review of the literature, to identify the unmet supportive care needs of Arab people affected by cancer (patients and caregivers), and the impact of these needs on quality of life and psychosocial well-being. In July 2015 databases, search engines and electronic list(More)
This paper aims to evaluate the impact of the culturally sensitive and linguistically appropriate education program on the following: (i) awareness of screening practices (breast awareness, mammogram, and Pap smear test); (ii) screening intention within the next six months; and (iii) knowledge about breast and cervical cancer among Chinese-Australian women.(More)
BACKGROUND The Breast Cancer Screening Beliefs Questionnaire (BCSBQ) has been designed as a culturally appropriate instrument for assessing women's beliefs, knowledge and attitudes to breast cancer and breast cancer screening practices. While it has proved to be a reliable instrument when applied to women of Chinese, Arabic and Korean origin living in(More)
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