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The response of a neuron in the visual cortex to stimuli of different contrast placed in its receptive field is commonly characterized using the contrast response curve. When attention is directed into the receptive field of a V4 neuron, its contrast response curve is shifted to lower contrast values (Reynolds et al., 2000). The neuron will thus be able to(More)
Receptive fields of neurons in cortical area V4 are large enough to fit multiple stimuli, making V4 the ideal place to study the effects of selective attention at the single-neuron level. Experiments have revealed evidence for stimulus competition and have characterized the effect thereon of spatial and feature-based attention. We developed a biophysical(More)
We can recognize objects in complex images in a fraction of a second. Neuronal responses in macaque areas V4 and inferior temporal cortex to preferred stimuli are typically suppressed by the addition of other objects within the receptive field (see, however, [16, 17]). How can this suppression be reconciled with rapid visual recognition in complex scenes?(More)
Many neurons in the visual cortex are orientation-selective, increase their firing rate with contrast and are modulated by attention. What is the cortical circuit that underlies these computations? We examine how synchrony can be modulated by the excitability of interneurons, in a model layer 4 network displaying contrast-invariant orientation-tuning. We(More)
The ability to covertly select visual stimuli in our environment based on their behavioral relevance is an important skill. Stimulus selection has been studied experimentally, at the single neuron as well as at the population level, by recording from the visual cortex of subjects performing attention-demanding tasks, but studies at the local circuit level(More)
Natural vision often involves recognizing objects from partial information. Recognition of objects from parts presents a significant challenge for theories of vision because it requires spatial integration and extrapolation from prior knowledge. Here we recorded intracranial field potentials of 113 visually selective electrodes from epilepsy patients in(More)
Receptive fields of neurons in cortical area V4 are large enough to fit multiple stimuli, making V4 the ideal place to study the effects of selective attention at the single neuron level. Experiments have revealed evidence for stimulus competition and have characterized the effect thereon of spatial and feature-based attention. We developed a biophysical(More)
Recognition of objects from partial information presents a significant challenge for theories of vision because it requires spatial integration and extrapolation from prior knowledge. We combined neurophysiological recordings in human cortex with psychophysical measurements and computational modeling to investigate the mechanisms involved in object(More)
An illusory contour is an image that is perceived as a contour in the absence of typical contour characteristics, such as a change in luminance or chromaticity across the stimulus. In cats and primates, cells that respond to illusory contours are sparse in cortical area V1, but are found in greater numbers in cortical area V2. We propose a model capable of(More)