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Overweight, obesity, and mortality from cancer in a prospectively studied cohort of U.S. adults.
TLDR
Current patterns of overweight and obesity in the United States could account for 14 percent of all deaths from cancer in men and 20 percent of those in women, and increased body weight was associated with increased death rates for all cancers combined and for cancers at multiple specific sites. Expand
Body-mass index and mortality in a prospective cohort of U.S. adults.
TLDR
The risk of death from all causes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, or other diseases increases throughout the range of moderate and severe overweight for both men and women in all age groups. Expand
Genome-wide association study of prostate cancer identifies a second risk locus at 8q24
TLDR
Observations indicate the presence of at least two independent loci within 8q24 that contribute to prostate cancer in men of European ancestry, and it is estimated that the population attributable risk of the new locus, marked by rs6983267, is higher than the locus marked byrs1447295. Expand
Multiple loci identified in a genome-wide association study of prostate cancer
TLDR
The findings point to multiple loci with moderate effects associated with susceptibility to prostate cancer that, taken together, in the future may predict high risk in select individuals. Expand
Body Mass Index and Mortality in a Prospective Cohort of US Adults
TLDR
A prospective study of the relationship of body-mass index (BMI) to mortality using data from the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Prevention Study II, which tried to avoid the problems where other studies of BMI and mortality have been criticized. Expand
A large cohort study of long-term daily use of adult-strength aspirin and cancer incidence.
TLDR
Long-term daily use of adult-strength aspirin may be associated with modestly reduced overall cancer incidence in populations among whom colorectal, prostate, and breast cancers are common. Expand
Calcium, vitamin D, dairy products, and risk of colorectal cancer in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort (United States)
TLDR
The hypothesis that calcium modestly reduces risk of colorectal cancer is supported, as well as the association between vitamin D and diet, and calcium, vitamin D, and dairy product intake in a large prospective cohort of United States men and women. Expand
Dairy, Calcium, and Vitamin D Intake and Postmenopausal Breast Cancer Risk in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort
TLDR
The hypothesis that dietary calcium and/or some other components in dairy products may modestly reduce risk of postmenopausal breast cancer is supported. Expand
Obesity, Recreational Physical Activity, and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer In a Large U.S. Cohort
TLDR
The hypothesis that obesity and central adiposity are associated with pancreatic cancer risk is supported, along with several recent studies. Expand
The American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort
TLDR
Large‐scale, prospective cohort studies have played a critical role in discovering factors that contribute to variability in cancer risk in human populations and these ACS cohorts have made landmark contributions in many areas of epidemiologic research. Expand
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