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Laboratory diagnosis of heparin‐associated thrombocytopenia and comparison of platelet aggregation test, heparin‐induced platelet activation test, and platelet factor 4/heparin enzyme‐linked
BACKGROUND: As clinical diagnosis of heparin‐associated thrombocytopenia (HAT) is often difficult, confirmation by sensitive laboratory assays is desirable.
Drug‐induced immune hemolytic anemia
Drug-induced immune cytopenias, although infrequently recognized, may cause significant morbidity and mortality as indicated by two reports of severe immune hemolytic anemia (IHA) caused by
Heparin-associated thrombocytopenia: the antibody is not heparin specific.
TLDR
It is found that the major factor for eliciting platelet activation with sera of HAT type II patients is neither the structure nor the AT III binding capacity of an oligosaccharide, but rather its grade of sulfation.
Heparin-associated thrombocytopenia: isolation of the antibody and characterization of a multimolecular PF4-heparin complex as the major antigen.
TLDR
It is concluded that multimolecular PF4/heparin complexes represent the major antigen in HAT and might present several epitopes and form immune complexes after HAT antibody binding which activate platelets via the FcRII.
A rapid and sensitive test for diagnosing heparin-associated thrombocytopenia.
TLDR
Using sera of 34 patients with clinically suspected HAT, the HIPA assay is found to be as sensitive as the SRA and superior to PAA and may be a useful tool for differential diagnosis and therapy in patients with HAT.
Analysis of granulocyte‐reactive antibodies using an immunoassay based upon monoclonal‐antibody‐specific immobilization of granulocyte antigens
TLDR
A glycoprotein‐specific enzyme immunoassay for platelet antibodies was adapted for the use of granulocytes as target cells to allow identification of different granulocyte‐reactive antibodies present in the same sample without the need for complicated absorption studies.
Autoantibodies against platelet glycoprotein Ib/IX: a frequent finding in autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura
TLDR
The observation that in 23 (28%) of these sera the antigenic determinants could not be assigned to the glycoproteins under investigation suggests that platelet autoantibodies may react with other GPs or other membrane constituents, e.g. glycolipids.
NA gene frequencies in the German population, determined by polymerase chain reaction with sequence‐specific primers
TLDR
The NA2 gene is more frequent in the German population than the NA1 gene, as determined by genotyping using PCR‐SSP, in contrast to GIFT, which showed an error rate for NA typing of 15 percent.
Serological and clinical aspects of granulocyte antibodies leading to alloimmune neonatal neutropenia
TLDR
None of the new‐born of mothers alloimmunized to granulocyte antigens developed neutropenia, which suggests an incidence of ANN below 0.1%.
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