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From spatial orientation to food acquisition in echolocating bats
TLDR
This conceptual framework calls for a new view on field data from bats orienting and foraging in different types of habitats according to the ecological constraints in which foraging bats operate, four distinct functional groups or guilds within each group, signal design and echolocation behavior are rather similar. Expand
Echolocation behavior of big brown bats, Eptesicus fuscus, in the field and the laboratory.
  • A. Surlykke, C. Moss
  • Physics, Medicine
  • The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
  • 14 November 2000
TLDR
Echolocation signals were recorded from big brown bats, Eptesicus fuscus, flying in the field and the laboratory, and in the terminal phase of insect capture sequences, where Fmin decreased with decreasing signal duration. Expand
Elephant Memories: Thirteen Years in the Life of an Elephant Family
Cynthia Moss has studied the elephants in Kenya's Amboseli National Park for over twenty-seven years. Her long-term research has revealed much of what we now know about these complex and intelligentExpand
Active Listening for Spatial Orientation in a Complex Auditory Scene
TLDR
Adaptive temporal control of vocal–motor behavior in an echolocating bat, Eptesicus fuscus, as it captured tethered insects close to background vegetation is reported on. Expand
Ontogeny of vocal signals in the little brown bat, Myotis lucifugus
TLDR
Developmental changes in the vocal signals produced by wild-caught pre-volant and volant Myotis lucifugus showed an increase in sound frequency, an increased in sound repetition rate and a decrease in sound duration as the animals matured. Expand
Acoustic scanning of natural scenes by echolocation in the big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus
SUMMARY Echolocation allows bats to orient and localize prey in complete darkness. The sonar beam of the big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus, is directional but broad enough to provide audible echoExpand
Hippocampal cellular and network activity in freely moving echolocating bats
TLDR
The first hippocampal recordings from echolocating bats are reported, which showed place cells very similar to those of rodents, and support the hypothesis that theta oscillation in the mammalian hippocampus is involved in sequence learning and hence, theta power should increase with sensory-input rate. Expand
Auditory scene analysis by echolocation in bats.
  • C. Moss, A. Surlykke
  • Computer Science, Medicine
  • The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
  • 2 October 2001
TLDR
It is hypothesized that a stable sonar signal production rate facilitates the perceptual organization of echoes arriving from objects at different directions and distances as the bat flies through a dynamic auditory scene. Expand
The bat head-related transfer function reveals binaural cues for sound localization in azimuth and elevation.
TLDR
Analysis of the spatial and spectral characteristics of the bat HRTF reveals that both interaural level differences (ILD) and monaural spectral features are subject to changes in sound source azimuth and elevation. Expand
The sonar beam pattern of a flying bat as it tracks tethered insects.
  • K. Ghose, C. Moss
  • Physics, Medicine
  • The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
  • 30 July 2003
TLDR
Measurements of the sonar beam pattern of flying echolocating bats, Eptesicus fuscus, performing various insect capture tasks in a large laboratory flight room suggest that the axis of the bat father beam is a good index of selective tracking of targets, and in this respect is analogous to gaze in predominantly visual animals. Expand
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