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Evidence for a canonical gamma-ray burst afterglow light curve in the Swift XRT data
We present new observations of the early X-ray afterglows of the first 27 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) well observed by the Swift X-Ray Telescope (XRT). The early X-ray afterglows show a canonicalExpand
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A Low-Magnetic-Field Soft Gamma Repeater
Odd Magnetar Magnetars are neutron stars that are widely thought to be powered by extremely high magnetic fields. Using data from three different x-ray observatories, Rea et al. (p. 944, publishedExpand
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Discovery of a Magnetar Associated with the Soft Gamma Repeater SGR 1900+14
The soft gamma repeater SGR 1900+14 became active again on 1998 June after a long period of quiescence; it remained at a low state of activity until 1998 August, when it emitted a series ofExpand
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The Metamorphosis of SN 1998bw
We present and discuss the photometric and spectroscopic evolution of the peculiar SN 1998bw, associated with GRB 980425, through an analysis of optical and near-IR data collected at ESOLa Silla. TheExpand
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The missing link: Merging neutron stars naturally produce jet-like structures and can power short gamma-ray bursts
Short Gamma-Ray Bursts (SGRBs) are among the most luminous explosions in the universe, releasing in less than one second the energy emitted by our Galaxy over one year. Despite decades ofExpand
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Discovery of a transient magnetar: XTE J1810-197
We report the discovery of a new X-ray pulsar, XTE J1810-197, that was serendipitously discovered on 2003 July 15 by the Rossi X- Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) while observing the soft gamma repeaterExpand
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Discovery of Intense Gamma-Ray Flashes of Atmospheric Origin
Detectors aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory have observed an unexplained terrestrial phenomenon: brief, intense flashes of gamma rays. These flashes must originate in the atmosphere atExpand
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Reactivation and Precise Interplanetary Network Localization of the Soft Gamma Repeater SGR 1900+14
In 1998 May, the soft gamma repeater SGR 1900+14 emerged from several years of quiescence and emitted a series of intense bursts, one with a time history unlike any previously observed from thisExpand
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Swift Discovery of a New Soft Gamma Repeater, SGR J1745-29, near Sagittarius A*
Starting in 2013 February, Swift has been performing short daily monitoring observations of the G2 gas cloud near Sgr A* with the X-Ray Telescope to determine whether the cloud interaction leads toExpand
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Observations of GRB 990123 by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory
GRB 990123 was the first burst from which simultaneous optical, X-ray, and gamma-ray emission was detected; its afterglow has been followed by an extensive set of radio, optical, and X-rayExpand
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