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An X-ray pulsar with a superstrong magnetic field in the soft γ-ray repeater SGR1806 − 20
Soft γ-ray repeaters (SGRs) emit multiple, brief (∼0.1-s), intense outbursts of low-energy γ-rays. They are extremely rare—three are known in our Galaxy and one in the Large Magellanic Cloud. TwoExpand
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An unusual supernova in the error box of the γ-ray burst of 25 April 1998
TLDR
We report the discovery of transient optical emission in the error box of the γ-ray burst GRB980425, the light curve of which was very different from that of previous optical afterglows associated with β�-ray bursts. Expand
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Long γ-ray bursts and core-collapse supernovae have different environments
When massive stars exhaust their fuel, they collapse and often produce the extraordinarily bright explosions known as core-collapse supernovae. On occasion, this stellar collapse also powers an evenExpand
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A hypernova model for the supernova associated with the γ-ray burst of 25 April 1998
The discovery of the unusual supernova SN1998bw, and its possible association with the γ-ray burst GRB 980425, provide new insights into the explosion mechanism of very massive stars and the originExpand
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A very energetic supernova associated with the γ-ray burst of 29 March 2003
Over the past five years evidence has mounted that long-duration (>2 s) γ-ray bursts (GRBs)—the most luminous of all astronomical explosions—signal the collapse of massive stars in our Universe. ThisExpand
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A short γ-ray burst apparently associated with an elliptical galaxy at redshift z = 0.225
Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) come in two classes: long (> 2 s), soft-spectrum bursts and short, hard events. Most progress has been made on understanding the long GRBs, which are typically observed atExpand
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A limit on the variation of the speed of light arising from quantum gravity effects
A cornerstone of Einstein’s special relativity is Lorentz invariance—the postulate that all observers measure exactly the same speed of light in vacuum, independent of photon-energy. While specialExpand
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Detection of a γ-ray burst of very long duration and very high energy
ALTHOUGH γ-ray bursts (GRBs) have been known for more than 20 years, their origin remains mysterious1. Suggestions have ranged from nearby colliding comets2 to merging neutron stars at cosmologicalExpand
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A giant γ-ray flare from the magnetar SGR 1806–20
Two classes of rotating neutron stars—soft γ-ray repeaters (SGRs) and anomalous X-ray pulsars—are magnetars, whose X-ray emission is powered by a very strong magnetic field (B ≈ 1015 G). SGRsExpand
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An optical supernova associated with the X-ray flash XRF 060218
Long-duration γ-ray bursts (GRBs) are associated with type Ic supernovae that are more luminous than average and that eject material at very high velocities. Less-luminous supernovae were notExpand
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