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Inferring the structure and dynamics of interactions in schooling fish
TLDR
Comparing data from two-fish and three-fish shoals challenges the standard assumption that individual motion results from averaging responses to each neighbor considered separately and finds no evidence for explicit matching of body orientation.
Collective States, Multistability and Transitional Behavior in Schooling Fish
TLDR
This study demonstrates that collective motion can be effectively mapped onto a set of order parameters describing the macroscopic group structure, revealing the existence of at least three dynamically-stable collective states; swarm, milling and polarized groups.
Emergent Sensing of Complex Environments by Mobile Animal Groups
TLDR
It is revealed that this emergent problem solving is the predominant mechanism by which a mobile animal group responds to complex environmental gradients.
Predatory Fish Select for Coordinated Collective Motion in Virtual Prey
TLDR
It is demonstrated that collective motion could evolve as a response to predation, without prey being able to detect and respond to predators.
Potential Leaders Trade Off Goal-Oriented and Socially Oriented Behavior in Mobile Animal Groups
TLDR
A simple model of self-organized coordination and leadership in groups is recreated, including the apparent consensus behavior among naive individuals, which requires informed individuals to appropriately balance goal-oriented and socially oriented behavior.
Uninformed Individuals Promote Democratic Consensus in Animal Groups
TLDR
This work uses theory and experiment to demonstrate that, for a wide range of conditions, a strongly opinionated minority can dictate group choice, but the presence of uninformed individuals spontaneously inhibits this process, returning control to the numerical majority.
Predation Risk as a Driving Force for Sexual Segregation: A Cross‐Population Comparison
TLDR
It is concluded that sexual segregation in guppies is consistent with the predation risk hypothesis: sexual segregation results from a combination ofpredation risk driving males (the more vulnerable sex) into less risky habitats and females gaining benefits of reduced sexual harassment by remaining in high‐predation environments.
Unified effects of aggregation reveal larger prey groups take longer to find
TLDR
A two-dimensional model based on visual angle shows that prey are found with more difficulty when they aggregate, giving an additional anti-predatory benefit to group living rather than a cost.
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