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Watercress supplementation in diet reduces lymphocyte DNA damage and alters blood antioxidant status in healthy adults.
TLDR
The theory that consumption of watercress can be linked to a reduced risk of cancer via decreased damage to DNA and possible modulation of antioxidant status by increasing carotenoid concentrations is supported.
The effect of cruciferous and leguminous sprouts on genotoxicity, in vitro and in vivo.
TLDR
The theory that consumption of cruciferous vegetables is linked to a reduced risk of cancer via decreased damage to DNA is supported.
Potential anti‐cancer effects of virgin olive oil phenolson colorectal carcinogenesis models in vitro
TLDR
It is demonstrated that phenols extracted from virgin olive oil are capable of inhibiting several stages in colon carcinogenesis in vitro and had no significant effect on metastasis‐related gene expression in HT115 cells.
Seaweed and human health.
TLDR
This review is the first to critically evaluate human studies of the beneficial effect of seaweed and seaweed components on markers of human health and disease status, aiming to draw attention to gaps in current knowledge, which will aid the planning and implementation of future studies.
Anti-cancer properties of phenolics from apple waste on colon carcinogenesis in vitro.
Colon-available raspberry polyphenols exhibit anti-cancer effects on in vitro models of colon cancer
TLDR
The results indicate that raspberry phytochemicals likely to reach the colon are capable of inhibiting several important stages in colon carcinogenesis in vitro.
Diet, fecal water, and colon cancer--development of a biomarker.
TLDR
The literature indicates that fecal water activity markers are affected by specific dietary components linked with CRC risk: red meat, saturated fats, bile acids, and fatty acids are associated with an increase in fecalWater toxicity, while the converse appears to be true for calcium, probiotics, and prebiotics.
Diet and cancer: assessing the risk
TLDR
An overview of the intermediate endpoints available for the study of CRC, particularly non-invasive faecal biomarkers, are provided and examples of their use in dietary intervention studies are given.
Gastrointestinal modifications and bioavailability of brown seaweed phlorotannins and effects on inflammatory markers
TLDR
It is shown for the first time that seaweed phlorotannins are metabolised and absorbed, predominantly in the large intestine, and there is a large inter-individual variation in their metabolic profile.
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