• Publications
  • Influence
Heartworm disease in animals and humans.
Heartworm disease due to Dirofilaria immitis continues to cause severe disease and even death in dogs and other animals in many parts of the world, even though safe, highly effective and convenientExpand
  • 369
  • 46
Phylogeny of Wolbachia in filarial nematodes
Intracellular bacteria have been observed in various species of filarial nematodes (family Onchocercidae). The intracellular bacterium of the canine filaria Dirofilaria immitis has been shown to beExpand
  • 517
  • 26
The northward spread of leishmaniasis in Italy: evidence from retrospective and ongoing studies on the canine reservoir and phlebotomine vectors
Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) incidence has been increased in Italy in humans and dogs since the 1990s, with new foci being detected within traditional boundaries of endemic transmission but also inExpand
  • 241
  • 24
Climate and Dirofilaria infection in Europe.
Climatic changes, together with an increase in the movement of cats and dogs across Europe, have caused an increase in the geographical range of several vector borne parasites like Dirofilaria, andExpand
  • 247
  • 19
A phylogenetic analysis of filarial nematodes: comparison with the phylogeny of Wolbachia endosymbionts.
Infection with the endosymbiotic bacteria Wolbachia is widespread in filarial nematodes. Previous studies have suggested concordance between the phylogeny of Wolbachia with that of their nematodeExpand
  • 305
  • 18
  • PDF
Is heartworm disease really spreading in Europe?
Based on recently published surveys and newly acquired data, a study was conducted to verify the distribution of filarial worm (Filarioidea) infections in Europe, with particular emphasis on canineExpand
  • 190
  • 17
Dirofilarial infections in Europe.
Nematodes of the genus Dirofilaria are currently considered emerging agents of parasitic zoonoses in Europe. Climatic changes and an increase in the movement of reservoirs (mostly infected dogs) haveExpand
  • 164
  • 17
Vector-borne helminths of dogs and humans in Europe
Presently, 45% of the total human population of Europe, as well as their domestic and companion animals, are exposed to the risk of vector-borne helminths (VBH) causing diseases. A plethora ofExpand
  • 170
  • 14
  • PDF
Changing climate and changing vector-borne disease distribution: the example of Dirofilaria in Europe.
Climatic changes, together with an increase in the movement of dogs across Europe, have caused an increase in the geographical range of Dirofilaria infections. The present paper is focuses onExpand
  • 121
  • 14