• Publications
  • Influence
Extracellular histones are major mediators of death in sepsis
TLDR
It is concluded that extracellular histones are potential molecular targets for therapeutics for sepsis and other inflammatory diseases. Expand
The interactions between inflammation and coagulation
  • C. Esmon
  • Medicine
  • British journal of haematology
  • 1 November 2005
TLDR
Downregulation of anticoagulant pathways not only promotes thrombosis but also amplifies the inflammatory process, such as manifested in severe sepsis or inflammatory bowel disease. Expand
Future research directions in acute lung injury: summary of a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute working group.
TLDR
Improved understanding of disease heterogeneity through use of evolving biologic, genomic, and genetic approaches should provide major new insights into pathogenesis of ALI. Expand
Extracellular Histones Are Mediators of Death through TLR2 and TLR4 in Mouse Fatal Liver Injury
TLDR
The studies imply that histone release contributes to death in inflammatory injury and in chemical-induced cellular injury, both of which are mediated in part through the TLRs. Expand
The protein C pathway.
  • C. Esmon
  • Medicine
  • Critical care medicine
  • 1 September 2003
TLDR
Animal studies and preliminary clinical results suggest that protein C/activated protein C supplementation may be useful in reversing microvascular dysfunction, and the mechanisms by which inflammation impairs the function of this pathway are reviewed. Expand
The roles of protein C and thrombomodulin in the regulation of blood coagulation.
  • C. Esmon
  • Medicine, Biology
  • The Journal of biological chemistry
  • 1 December 1984
TLDR
The data presented here suggest that deficiencics in protein S, thrombomodulin, or the platelet receptor for activated protein C might also result in a thromBotic tendency. Expand
Identification, cloning, and regulation of a novel endothelial cell protein C/activated protein C receptor.
TLDR
Identification of endothelial cell protein C receptor as a member of the CD1/major histocompatibility complex superfamily provides insights into the role of protein C in regulating the inflammatory response. Expand
Extracellular histones promote thrombin generation through platelet-dependent mechanisms: involvement of platelet TLR2 and TLR4.
TLDR
Data show that histone-activated platelets possess a procoagulant phenotype that drives plasma thrombin generation and suggest that TLR2 and TLR4 mediate the activation process. Expand
The endothelial cell protein C receptor augments protein C activation by the thrombin-thrombomodulin complex.
TLDR
It is demonstrated that monoclonal antibodies that block protein C binding to the endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR) reduce protein C activation rates by the thrombin-thrombomodulin complex on endothelium, but that antibodies that bind to EPCR without blockingprotein C binding have no effect. Expand
Inflammation and thrombosis
  • C. Esmon
  • Medicine
  • Journal of thrombosis and haemostasis : JTH
  • 1 July 2003
TLDR
A review of the interactions between inflammation and coagulation and inflammatory mediators will summarize the insights into the evolution and linkages that have become evident from recent structural studies. Expand
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