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Bird Song: Biological Themes and Variations
Introduction 1. The study of bird song 2. Production and perception 3. How song develops 4. Getting the message across 5. When do birds sing? 6. Recognition and territorial defence 7. SexualExpand
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Bird Song: Contents
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Song as an honest signal of developmental stress in the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata)
In a wide range of bird species, females have been shown to express active preferences for males that sing more complex songs. Current sexual selection theory predicts that for this signal to remainExpand
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Song as an honest signal of past developmental stress in the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris)
Bird song is a sexually selected male trait where females select males on the basis of song quality. It has recently been suggested that the quality of the adult male song may be determined byExpand
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Developmental stress selectively affects the song control nucleus HVC in the zebra finch
Songbirds sing complex songs as a result of evolution through sexual selection. The evolution of such sexually selected traits requires genetic control, as well as selection on their expression. SongExpand
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Developmental stress affects the attractiveness of male song and female choice in the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata)
Developmental stress has recently been shown to have adverse effects upon adult male song structure in birds, which may well act as an honest signal of male quality to discriminating females.Expand
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Parasites affect song complexity and neural development in a songbird
There is now considerable evidence that female choice drives the evolution of song complexity in many songbird species. However, the underlying basis for such choice remains controversial. TheExpand
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Bird song, sexual selection and female choice.
  • C. Catchpole
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Trends in ecology & evolution
  • 1 April 1987
Male songbirds produce extremely elaborate songs, which are the acoustic equivalent of the peacock's tail. Darwin suggested that they were the result of sexual selection by female choice, but had noExpand
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Developmental stress, social rank and song complexity in the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris)
Bird song is a sexually selected trait and females have been shown to prefer males that sing more complex songs. However, for repertoire size to be an honest signal of male quality it must beExpand
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