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Forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume at 1 second (FEV(1)), and FEV(1)/FVC ratios were determined for 531 individuals of Han Chinese descent living at low altitude (250 m) near Beijing and for 592 individuals of Han descent who were born and raised at three high altitudes (3,200 m, 3,800 m, 4,300 m) in Qinghai Province, P.R.C. The study(More)
This study compares the stature, weight, skinfolds, upper arm muscle area, and chest dimensions of Tibetan children, adolescents, and young adults who were born and raised, or who had lived from infancy, at 3,200 m, 3,800 m, and 4,300 m in Qinghai Province, People's Republic of China. While the individuals measured in Qinghai are among the tallest and(More)
OBJECTIVES This study compares forced vital capacity (FVC) and Forced Expiratory Volume at 1 Second (FEV1 ) of Tibetans with those of Han who were born and raised at high altitude. MATERIALS AND METHODS FVC and FEV1 tests were conducted among 1,063 children and adolescents between the ages of 6 and 20 years, and 184 adults between the ages of 21 and 39(More)
This study describes the hemoglobin concentration ([Hb]) and hematocrit (HCT) of over 1,000 Tibetan and Han children, adolescents, and young adults who were born and raised at 3,200 m, 3,800 m, or 4,300 m in Qinghai Province, western China. At 3,200 m, no altitude effect is evident in the hematological characteristics of either group. At 3,800 m and 4,300(More)
BACKGROUND Studies comparing the growth of indigenous high-altitude Aymara children and children of low-altitude European descent who have been born and raised at high altitude in the Andes have provided evidence for genetically-determined differences in thorax growth, as well as for population differences in height, weight and other measures of overall(More)
While many studies have compared Tibetans and low-altitude born Han living at high altitude, few have carefully controlled the chronological age at which lowlanders migrated, the length of time they had lived at high altitude, their nutrition, and their socio-economic status. This has produced an array of results that frequently do not support the(More)
This study compares the morphological characteristics of Han children, adolescents, and young adults who were born at 250 m near Beijing and at three high altitudes in Qinghai Province, Peoples Republic of China (3,200 m, 3,800 m, and 4,300 m). From ages 6 through 15, Han children growing up at high altitudes are significantly shorter, lighter, have less(More)
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