C . Polanskey

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The Galileo spacecraft has been orbiting Jupiter since 7 December 1995, and encounters one of the four galilean satellites-Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto-on each orbit. Initial results from the spacecraft's magnetometer have indicated that neither Europa nor Callisto have an appreciable internal magnetic field, in contrast to Ganymede and possibly Io.(More)
Along Ulysses' path from Jupiter to the south ecliptic pole, the onboard dust detector measured a dust impact rate that varied slowly from 0.2 to 0.5 impacts per day. The dominant component of the dust flux arrived from an ecliptic latitude and longitude of 100 + 10 degrees and 280 degrees +/- 30 degrees which indicates an interstellar origin. An additional(More)
On 19 December 1996 as Galileo passed close to Jupiter's moon, Europa, the magnetometer measured substantial departures from the slowly varying background field of Jupiter's magnetosphere. Currents coupling Europa to Jupiter's magnetospheric plasma could produce perturbations of the observed size. However, the trend of the field perturbations is here(More)
On 6 March 2015, Dawn arrived at Ceres to find a dark, desiccated surface punctuated by small, bright areas. Parts of Ceres' surface are heavily cratered, but the largest expected craters are absent. Ceres appears gravitationally relaxed at only the longest wavelengths, implying a mechanically strong lithosphere with a weaker deep interior. Ceres' dry(More)
exchange or if it can undergo proton exchange without dissociation, we monitored the signal at mass 48 (dashed line). This mass corresponds to DCOOD+ from DCOOD monomer and to (DCOOH)H+ from doubly proton-exchanged dimer. The fast arrival times in the mass-48 spectrum indicate that the signal arises mostly from contaminant DCOOD monomer in the incident beam(More)
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