Céline Guigoni

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Involuntary movements, or dyskinesia, represent a debilitating complication of levodopa therapy for Parkinson's disease. Although changes affecting D(1) and D(2) dopamine receptors have been studied in association with this condition, no causal relationship has yet been established. Taking advantage of a monkey brain bank constituted to study(More)
The classic view of anatomofunctional organization of the basal ganglia is that striatopallidal neurons of the "indirect" pathway express D2 dopamine receptors and corelease enkephalin with GABA, whereas striatopallidal neurons of the "direct" pathway bear D1 dopamine receptors and corelease dynorphin and substance P with GABA. Although many studies have(More)
Involuntary movements, or dyskinesia, represent a debilitating complication of levodopa therapy for Parkinson's disease. Taking advantage of a monkey brain bank constituted to study the pathophysiology of levodopa-induced dyskinesia, we here report the changes affecting D1, D2 and D3 dopamine receptors within the striatum of four experimental groups of(More)
Dyskinesias represent a debilitating complication of levodopa therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD). While we recently demonstrated that levodopa-induced dyskinesia results from increased dopamine D(1) receptor-mediated transmission, we also questioned the possible role of subcellular localization of D(1) and D(2) receptors in mediating these effects as we(More)
BACKGROUND A role for enhanced opioid peptide transmission has been suggested in the genesis of levodopa-induced dyskinesia. However, basal ganglia nuclei other than the striatum have not been regarded as potential sources, and the opioid precursors have never been quantified simultaneously with the levels of opioid receptors at the peak of dyskinesia(More)
The extent of nigrostriatal denervation is presumed to play a role in the genesis of levodopa-induced dyskinesia. Yet some parkinsonian patients who have been treated over a long period do not develop dyskinesia, raising the possibility that the pattern of denervation is as important as the extent of lesioning as a risk factor. Here we study the extent and(More)
BACKGROUND Involuntary movements, or dyskinesia, represent a debilitating complication of dopamine replacement therapy for Parkinson disease (PD). The transcription factor DeltaFosB accumulates in the denervated striatum and dimerizes primarily with JunD upon repeated L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) administration. Previous studies in rodents have(More)
The mechanisms of action of high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) remain only partially understood. Hitherto, experimental studies have suggested that STN-HFS reduces the activity of STN neurons. However, some recent reports have challenged this view, showing that STN-HFS might also increase the activity of globus pallidus(More)
Striatal GABAergic microcircuits modulate cortical responses and movement execution in part by controlling the activity of medium spiny neurons (MSNs). How this is altered by chronic dopamine depletion, such as in Parkinson's disease, is not presently understood. We now report that, in dopamine-depleted slices of the striatum, MSNs generate giant(More)
Cultures of purified rat embryonic spinal cord motoneurons were used to investigate the capacity of the neurons to survive rabies virus infection in vitro. In crude primary spinal cord cultures, neurons did not survive more than 2 days after rabies virus infection with the fixed strain Challenge Virus Standard. In contrast, virus-infected purified(More)