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Burgess Shale fossils illustrate the origin of the mandibulate body plan
TLDR
The presence of crustaceomorph traits in the Cambrian larvae of various clades basal to Mandibulata is reinterpreted as evidence for the existence of distinct ontogenetic niches among stem arthropods and Hymenocarines now illustrate that the subdivision of the basipod and the presence of proximal endites are likely to have been ancestral conditions critical for the evolution of coxal and pre-coxal features in mandibulates.
A new phyllopod bed-like assemblage from the Burgess Shale of the Canadian Rockies.
TLDR
The discovery of an extraordinary new soft-bodied fauna from the Burgess Shale is reported, and the presence of the stem arthropods Misszhouia and Primicaris, previously known only from the early Cambrian of China, suggests that the palaeogeographic ranges and longevity of Burgess Shales taxa may be underestimated.
A large new leanchoiliid from the Burgess Shale and the influence of inapplicable states on stem arthropod phylogeny
TLDR
A new leanchoiliid is described, Yawunik kootenayi gen. nov, based on 42 specimens from the newly discovered Marble Canyon locality of the Burgess Shale, which stresses the historical importance of polarization over data content in scenarios of early arthropod evolution and a pressing need to investigate the impacts of coding inapplicables, especially given the inflating effect of implied weights.
Waptia fieldensis Walcott, a mandibulate arthropod from the middle Cambrian Burgess Shale
TLDR
It is construe that Waptia was an active swimming predator of soft prey items, using its anterior appendages for food capture and manipulation, and also potentially for clinging to epibenthic substrates.
Three new naraoiid species from the Burgess Shale, with a morphometric and phylogenetic reinvestigation of Naraoiidae
TLDR
It is demonstrated that Naraoia and Misszhouia can be discriminated morphometrically, based on simple metrics of the dorsal exoskeleton, which helps with inter‐specific discrimination and illustrate possible cases of sexual dimorphism.
Fossil Ponerinae (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in Early Eocene amber of France
TLDR
The two best-preserved morphotypes are described: a possible ergatoid queen representing the earliest known occurrence of the extant genus Platythyrea Roger, and a male morphotype related to the equivocal, paraphyletic genus Pachycondyla Smith, thus described herein but not formally assigned to genus until the male-based taxonomy of Ponerinae is better established.
A middle Cambrian arthropod with chelicerae and proto-book gills
TLDR
Fossil material from the middle Cambrian Burgess Shale is used to show that Mollisonia plenovenatrix possessed robust but short chelicerae that were placed very anteriorly, between the eyes, which suggests that chelicers evolved a specialized feeding function early on, possibly as a modification of short antennules.
Cambrian suspension-feeding lobopodians and the early radiation of panarthropods
TLDR
A Bayesian approach to cladistics supports the view that a semi-sessile, suspension-feeding lifestyle characterized the origin and rise of Panarthropoda from cycloneuralian body plans.
The First Ant-Termite Syninclusion in Amber with CT-Scan Analysis of Taphonomy
TLDR
A co-occurrence of ants and termites in a piece of Mexican amber suggests at least a middle Miocene antiquity for the modern, though poorly documented, relationship between Azteca ants and Nasutitermes termites.
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