Bryan P. Bergeron

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In computer-based medical education, there is frequently a need to present students with pictorial data representative of the natural variation associated with disease presentations as well as the progression of disease within an individual. Because of the difficulty in acquiring such data, image acquisition is often the most resource-intensive phase of(More)
Serious games are being actively explored as supplements to and, in some cases, replacement for traditional didactic lectures and computer-based instruction in venues ranging from medicine to the military. As part of an intelligent tutoring system (ITS) for nuclear event first responders, we designed and evaluated two serious games that were integrated with(More)
For neural networks to develop good internal representations for pattern mapping, noise in the training set data must be controlled. Because of the many difficulties associated with manually validating training data, we have focused on using decision table techniques as a practical, domain-independent means of optimizing training set formulation. Decision(More)
  • B Bergeron
  • 2000
This article explores the potential of E-mail as a medium of patient-physician communication. It introduces control tactics that physicians can consider to increase the efficiency of the medium. These include pre-qualifying the patients receiving the physician's E-mail address, establishing a code for high-risk patients, responding to E-mail only during(More)
  • B P Bergeron
  • 2000
Handheld, pen-based computing is an affordable, empowering technology that has application in small practice settings as well as in hospital-wide environments. Although hardware standards are evolving, there is now a stable base of applications, wired and wireless connectivity, and other features that make pen-based computing an attractive alternative to(More)
  • B P Bergeron
  • 2001
Large-vocabulary, continuous voice recognition technology, as well as the voice recognition industry, have matured to the point that the available tools are affordable and powerful enough to provide clinicians with an alternative to keyboard data entry. However, use of voice recognition technology in clinical medicine faces several practical(More)
  • B P Bergeron
  • 2001
Wireless computing, when integrated with the Web, is poised to revolutionize the practice and teaching of medicine. As vendors introduce wireless Web technologies in the medical community that have been used successfully in the business and consumer markets, clinicians can expect profound increases in the amount of patient data, as well as the ease with(More)