Bruce D Trapp

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BACKGROUND Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system and is the most common cause of neurologic disability in young adults. Despite antiinflammatory or immunosuppressive therapy, most patients have progressive neurologic deterioration that may reflect axonal loss. We conducted pathological studies of brain(More)
Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system that causes motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits. The present study characterized demyelinated lesions in the cerebral cortex of MS patients. One hundred twelve cortical lesions were identified in 110 tissue blocks from 50 MS patients. Three patterns of cortical(More)
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory-mediated demyelinating disease of the human central nervous system. The clinical disease course is variable, usually starts with reversible episodes of neurological disability in the third or fourth decade of life, and transforms into a disease of continuous and irreversible neurological decline by the sixth or(More)
Myelination increases neuronal conduction velocity through its insulating properties and an unidentified extrinsic effect that increases axonal caliber. Although it is well established that demyelination can cause axonal atrophy, the myelin molecule that regulates axonal caliber is not known. Loss of the structural proteins of compact peripheral nervous(More)
Bace1 is an endopeptidase that cleaves the amyloid precursor protein at the beta-secretase site. Apart from this cleavage, the functional importance of Bace1 in other physiological events is unknown. We show here that Bace1 regulates the process of myelination and myelin sheath thickness in the central and peripheral nerves. In Bace1-null mice, the process(More)
OBJECTIVE Degeneration of chronically demyelinated axons is a major cause of irreversible neurological disability in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Development of neuroprotective therapies will require elucidation of the molecular mechanisms by which neurons and axons degenerate. METHODS We report ultrastructural changes that support Ca2+-mediated(More)
BACKGROUND Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system that destroys myelin, oligodendrocytes, and axons. Since most of the lesions of multiple sclerosis are not remyelinated, enhancement of remyelination is a possible therapeutic strategy that could perhaps be achieved with the transplantation of oligodendrocyte-producing(More)
Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is an adult-onset neurodegenerative disorder that affects carriers, principally males, of premutation alleles (55-200 CGG repeats) of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene. Clinical features of FXTAS include progressive intention tremor and gait ataxia, accompanied by characteristic white matter(More)
The control of myelination by oligodendrocytes in the CNS is poorly understood. Here we show that LINGO-1 is an important negative regulator of this critical process. LINGO-1 is expressed in oligodendrocytes. Attenuation of its function by dominant-negative LINGO-1, LINGO-1 RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) or soluble human LINGO-1 (LINGO-1-Fc) leads to(More)
Demyelination is the hallmark of numerous neurodegenerative conditions, including multiple sclerosis. Oligodendrocyte progenitors (OPCs), which normally mature into myelin-forming oligodendrocytes, are typically present around demyelinated lesions but do not remyelinate affected axons. Here, we find that the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan accumulates in(More)