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A decade ago, there was widespread enthusiasm for the prospects of genome-wide association studies to identify common variants related to common chronic diseases using samples of unrelated individuals from populations. Although technological advancements allow us to query more than a million SNPs across the genome at low cost, a disappointingly small(More)
A common approach to genetic mapping of loci for complex diseases is to perform a genome-wide association study (GWAS) by analyzing a vast number of SNP markers in cohorts of unrelated cases and controls. A direct motivation for the case-control design is that unrelated, affected individuals can be easier to collect than large families with multiple(More)
UNLABELLED Many important problems in biology involve complex traits affected by multiple coding or regulatory parts of the genome. How well the underlying genetic architecture can be inferred by statistical methods such as mapping and association studies are active research areas. ForSim is a flexible forward evolutionary simulation tool for exploring the(More)
This journal began in 1925 as the Annals of Eugenics. Much has changed since then. The original Editors' primary eugenic objective was not achieved, and eugenics justifiably became notorious for racism and gross abuse of human rights. But one founding aim was to publish advances in statistical genetics, and that objective prospered in the journal's pages(More)
The Red Queen in "Through the Looking Glass" is often used as a metaphor for the relentless, unremitting competitive struggle by which Darwin described life. That imagery fits comfortably in our culture, with its emphasis on competition and inequity, but less so for nature herself. Life is manifestly much more about cooperation, at all levels and through a(More)
People around the world have folk origin myths, stories that explain where they came from and account for their place in the world and their differences from other peoples. As scientists, however, we claim to be seeking literal historical truth. In Western culture, typological ideas about human variation are at least as ancient as written discussion of the(More)
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