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Draft genome of the globally widespread and invasive Argentine ant (Linepithema humile)
TLDR
The draft genome sequence of a particularly widespread and well-studied species, the invasive Argentine ant, is reported, which was accomplished using a combination of 454 and Illumina sequencing and community-based funding rather than federal grant support.
The Genome Sequence of the Leaf-Cutter Ant Atta cephalotes Reveals Insights into Its Obligate Symbiotic Lifestyle
TLDR
Following recent reports of genome sequences from other insects that engage in symbioses with beneficial microbes, the A. cephalotes genome provides new insights into the symbiotic lifestyle of this ant and advances the understanding of host–microbe symbioss.
Draft genome of the red harvester ant Pogonomyrmex barbatus
TLDR
Gene networks involved in generating key differences between the queen and worker castes show signatures of increased methylation and suggest that ants and bees may have independently co-opted the same gene regulatory mechanisms for reproductive division of labor.
Large-scale coding sequence change underlies the evolution of postdevelopmental novelty in honey bees.
TLDR
It is shown that in the adult animal, the converse is true: Genes with low network connectedness (TRGs and tissue-specific conserved genes) underlie novel phenotypes by rapidly changing coding sequence to perform new-specialized functions.
Division of labor in honeybees: form, function, and proximate mechanisms
Honeybees exhibit two patterns of organization of work. In the spring and summer, division of labor is used to maximize growth rate and resource accumulation, while during the winter, worker
Deconstructing the Superorganism: Social Physiology, Groundplans, and Sociogenomics
TLDR
The groundplan hypothesis proposes that eusociality arose via simple changes in the regulation of ancestral gene sets affecting reproductive physiology and behavior, and it is argued that this hypothesis is explanatory for the evolution of division of labor but not for the regulatory systems that ensure group-level coordination of action.
Taxonomically restricted genes are associated with the evolution of sociality in the honey bee
TLDR
This work identifies a large number of candidate taxonomically restricted genes that may have played a role in eusocial evolution and lays the foundation for future functional genomics work on the evolution of novelty in the context of social behavior.
The origin of the odorant receptor gene family in insects
TLDR
The genomes of basal hexapod and insect lineages including Collembola, Diplura, Archaeognatha, Zygentoma, Odonata, and Ephemeroptera are investigated in an effort to identify the origin of the insect OR gene family, suggesting that ORs did evolve as adaptation to a terrestrial lifestyle outside high-humidity habitats.
Task partitioning in honey bees: the roles of signals and cues in group-level coordination of action
TLDR
It is argued that signals are preferable to cues in some instances because they can be actively targeted to their recipients, as opposed to cues, which are passive sources of information.
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