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SbcC-SbcD and ExoI process convergent forks to complete chromosome replication
Significance SbcC-SbcD and ExoI belong to a class of highly conserved nucleases that are critical to genome stability, but whose cellular function remains poorly understood. Human homologs of theseExpand
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RecBCD is required to complete chromosomal replication: Implications for double-strand break frequencies and repair mechanisms.
Several aspects of the mechanism of homologous double-strand break repair remain unclear. Although intensive efforts have focused on how recombination reactions initiate, far less is known about theExpand
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RecBCD, SbcCD and ExoI process a substrate created by convergent replisomes to complete DNA replication
The accurate completion of DNA replication on the chromosome requires RecBCD and structure specific SbcCD and ExoI nucleases. However, the substrates and mechanism by which this reaction occursExpand
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Dysregulation of magnesium transport protects Bacillus subtilis against manganese and cobalt intoxication.
Transition metals are essential for life, but are toxic when in excess. Metal ion intoxication may result from the mismetallation of essential metal-dependent enzymes with a non-cognate metal. ToExpand
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Group A Streptococcus AdcR Regulon Participates in Bacterial Defense against Host-Mediated Zinc Sequestration and Contributes to Virulence
Colonization by pathogenic bacteria depends on their ability to overcome host nutritional defenses and acquire nutrients. The human pathogen group A streptococcus (GAS) encounters the host defenseExpand
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Biphasic unbinding of a metalloregulator from DNA for transcription (de)repression in Live Bacteria
Abstract Microorganisms use zinc-sensing regulators to alter gene expression in response to changes in the availability of zinc, an essential micronutrient. Under zinc-replete conditions, theExpand
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UV‐induced DNA damage disrupts the coordination between replication initiation, elongation and completion
Replication initiation, elongation and completion are tightly coordinated to ensure that all sequences replicate precisely once each generation. UV‐induced DNA damage disrupts replication and delaysExpand