Brian C. Belyea

Learn More
Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common soft tissue sarcoma of childhood and adolescence. Despite intergroup clinical trials conducted in Europe and North America, outcomes for high risk patients with this disease have not significantly improved in the last several decades, and survival of metastatic or relapsed disease remains extremely poor. Accrual(More)
PURPOSE Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common soft tissue sarcoma of childhood and remains refractory to combined-modality therapy in patients with high risk disease. In skeletal myogenesis, Notch signaling prevents muscle differentiation and promotes proliferation of satellite cell progeny. Given its physiologic role in myogenesis and oncogenic role in(More)
PURPOSE Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a malignancy with features of skeletal muscle, and the most common soft tissue sarcoma of childhood. Survival for high-risk groups is approximately 30% at 5 years and there are no durable therapies tailored to its genetic aberrations. During genetic modeling of the common RMS variants, embryonal RMS (eRMS) and alveolar RMS(More)
Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common soft tissue sarcoma of childhood and adolescence, accounting for approximately 7% of childhood cancers. Current therapies include nonspecific cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens, radiation therapy, and surgery; however, these multimodality strategies are unsuccessful in the majority of patients with high-risk disease. It is(More)
Purpose: Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a malignancy with features of skeletal muscle, and the most common soft tissue sarcoma of childhood. Survival for high-risk groups is approximately 30% at 5 years and there are no durable therapies tailored to its genetic aberrations. During genetic modeling of the common RMS variants, embryonal RMS (eRMS) and alveolar RMS(More)
  • 1