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The rationale for the use of anti-glucocorticoids in the treatment of major depression has been reviewed. Four patients with chronic severe depression who were resistant to conventional therapies were given RU 486 (200 mg/day) for periods up to eight weeks. Substantial levels of RU 486 were achieved within the first few days, and the levels fell gradually(More)
  • B E Murphy
  • 1991
Patients with endogenous depression (major affective disorder) frequently have high cortisol levels, but the diurnal rhythm is usually maintained and they do not develop the physical signs of Cushing's syndrome. On the other hand, depression is a frequent feature of Cushing's syndrome regardless of etiology, and it is often relieved when the cortisol levels(More)
Many of the factors influencing the pharmacologic action of corticosteroids on the maternal-placental-fetal unit remains obscure. To clarify the effect of the placenta on corticoid transfer, tritiated steroids were incubated in saline for 2 hours with minces of midgestational or term placental tissue. The media were extracted and chromatographed on(More)
  • B E Murphy
  • 1991
The hypercorticism frequently observed in major depression, unaccompanied by signs of Cushing's syndrome, is still poorly understood. One suicidal young woman, with very high cortisol levels and unusual resistance to dexamethasone suppression, is described. She was successfully treated with steroid suppressive drugs (aminoglutethimide, metyrapone), had a(More)