Learn More
Mutation in the "nude" gene, i.e. the FoxN1 gene, induces a hairless phenotype and a rudimentary thymus gland in mice (nude mouse) and humans (T-cell related primary immunodeficiency). Conventional FoxN1 gene knockout and transgenic mouse models have been generated for studies of FoxN1 gene function related to skin and immune diseases, and for cancer(More)
FoxN1 is cell-autonomously expressed in skin and thymic epithelial cells (TECs), essential for their development. Inborn mutation of FoxN1 results in hair follicle and TEC development failure, whereas insufficient postnatal FoxN1 expression induces thymic atrophy, resulting in declined T lymphopoiesis. Although upregulating FoxN1 expression in the aged(More)
It is well known that age-related involution (shrinkage) of the thymus (a central cellular immune organ) results in decreased output of naïve T cells [1]. The insufficiency of naïve T cells significantly reduces the T cell receptor repertoire diversity, thereby leading to immunosenescence. However, the deleterious effects of thymic involution extend beyond(More)
The interaction between T cells and the central nervous system (CNS) in homeostasis and injury has been recognized being both pathogenic (CD4+ T-helper 1 - Th1, Th17 and γδT) and ameliorative (Th2 and regulatory T cells - Tregs). However, in-depth studies aimed to elucidate the precise in the aged microenvironment and the dichotomous role of Tregs have just(More)
  • 1