Bharath Srinivasan

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cN-II class of 5' purine nucleotidases exhibit specificity for IMP/GMP and belong to the HAD (haloacid dehalogenase) superfamily of hydrolases. The recently identified ISNI class of IMP specific 5'-nucleotidases occurring in yeast, fungi and certain Plasmodia lack sequence homology with the cN-II class of enzymes. We show from analysis of motif and fold(More)
Six human SP1 clones were isolated from a term placental cDNA library by immunological screening. All six cDNA clones cross-hybridized. However, at least two classes of cDNA could be distinguished, based on the presence or absence of an EcoRI site in the insert. Northern blot analysis of human term placental mRNA with all six cloned inserts demonstrated the(More)
Adenylosuccinate lyase (ASL) catalyzes two distinct but chemically similar reactions in purine biosynthesis. The first, exclusive to the de novo pathway involves the cleavage of 5-aminoimidazole-4-(N-succinylcarboxamide) ribonucleotide (SAICAR) to 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) and fumarate and the second common to both de novo and(More)
UNLABELLED Cytosolic nucleotidase II (cN-II) from Legionella pneumophila (Lp) catalyzes the hydrolysis of GMP and dGMP displaying sigmoidal curves, whereas catalysis of IMP hydrolysis displayed a biphasic curve in the initial rate versus substrate concentration plots. Allosteric modulators of mammalian cN-II did not activate LpcN-II although GTP, GDP and(More)
There is great interest in drugs that are capable of modulating multiple aging pathways, thereby delaying the onset and progression of aging. Effective strategies for drug development include the repurposing of existing drugs already approved by the FDA for human therapy. FDA approved drugs have known mechanisms of action and have been thoroughly screened(More)
Background: Identification of ligand-protein binding interactions is a critical step in drug discovery. Experimental screening of large chemical libraries, in spite of their specific role and importance in drug discovery, suffer from the disadvantages of being random, time-consuming and expensive. To accelerate the process, traditional structureor(More)
BACKGROUND Identification of ligand-protein binding interactions is a critical step in drug discovery. Experimental screening of large chemical libraries, in spite of their specific role and importance in drug discovery, suffer from the disadvantages of being random, time-consuming and expensive. To accelerate the process, traditional structure- or(More)
Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is a pivotal enzyme involved in the de novo pathway of purine synthesis, and hence, represents an attractive target to disrupt systems that require rapid DNA turnover. The enzyme acquires resistance to available drugs by various molecular mechanisms, which necessitates the continuous discovery of novel antifolates. Previously,(More)
Members of the haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) superfamily are emerging as an important group of enzymes by virtue of their role in diverse chemical reactions. In different Plasmodium species their number varies from 16 to 21. One of the HAD superfamily members, PVX_123945, a hypothetical protein from Plasmodium vivax, was selected for examining its substrate(More)
Often in pharmaceutical research the goal is to identify small molecules that can interact with and appropriately modify the biological behavior of a new protein target. Unfortunately, most proteins lack both known structures and small molecule binders, prerequisites of many virtual screening, VS, approaches. For such proteins, ligand homology modeling,(More)