Learn More
The transmission of pain signals after injury or inflammation depends in part on increased excitability of primary sensory neurons. Nociceptive neurons express multiple subtypes of voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV1s), each of which possesses unique features that may influence primary afferent excitability. Here, we examined the contribution of NaV1.9 to(More)
Fasting increases neuropeptide Y (NPY) expression, peptide levels, and the excitability of NPY-expressing neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate (ARC) nucleus. A subpopulation of ARC-NPY neurons ( approximately 40%) are glucose-inhibited (GI)-type glucose-sensing neurons. Hence, they depolarize in response to decreased glucose. Because fasting enhances NPY(More)
The mechanisms by which glucose regulates the activity of glucose-inhibited (GI) neurons in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) are largely unknown. We have previously shown that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) increases nitric oxide (NO) production in VMH GI neurons. We hypothesized that AMPK-mediated NO signaling is required for depolarization of VMH(More)
The melanocortin subtype-4 receptor (MC4R) has been implicated in the control of feeding behavior and body weight regulation. A series of tetrapeptides, based on Tic-DPhe-Arg-Trp-NH2-a mimic of the putative message sequence "His-Phe-Arg-Trp" and modified at the DPhe position, were prepared and pharmacologically characterized for potency and selectivity.(More)
Studies have demonstrated that blockade of diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) leads to prolonged release of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) after meal challenge. The current study was undertaken to investigate the mechanism of action underlying the elevated levels of GLP-1 release following pharmacological inhibition of DGAT1. We utilized a potent,(More)
(GI) neurons to decreased extracellular glucose. Abstract Fasting increases neuropeptide Y (NPY) expression, peptide levels and the excitability of NPY-expressing neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate (ARC) nucleus. A subpopulation of ARC-NPY neurons (~ 40%) are glucose-inhibited (GI)-type glucose sensing neurons. Hence, they depolarize in response to(More)
  • 1